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A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help.

There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce.

  Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later during the rest of the cooking process.

  A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I

I would suggest enameled cast iron rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help.

There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce.

  Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later during the rest of the cooking process.

  A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I would suggest enameled cast iron rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help.

There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce. Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later during the rest of the cooking process. A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond.

I would suggest enameled cast iron rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

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A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal, as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help. 

There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce. Normally

Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid, and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later, during the rest of the cooking process. A

A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I would suggest enameled cast iron, rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier, and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot, with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal, as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help. There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce. Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid, and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later, during the rest of the cooking process. A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I would suggest enameled cast iron, rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier, and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot, with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help. 

There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce.

Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later during the rest of the cooking process.

A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I would suggest enameled cast iron rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

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A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal, as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help. There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce. Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid, and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later, during the rest of the cooking process. A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I would suggest enameled cast iron, rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier, and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot, with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal, as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help. There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce. Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid, and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later, during the rest of the cooking process. A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I would suggest enameled cast iron, rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier, and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning.

A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal, as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help. There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a stew by browning meat and aromatics, the fond that forms at the bottom of the pot needs to be released to help form/flavor the sauce. Normally this is done with the addition of a small amount of liquid, and scraping the fond free with a wooden spoon. If you don't do this, you will be both losing a lot of flavor, and creating conditions for the fond to burn at the bottom of your pot later, during the rest of the cooking process. A heavy bottom pan has advantages in the creation of this fond. I would suggest enameled cast iron, rather than non-enameled. Maintenance is a bit easier, and you can usually avoid a black colored surface, which will help you more easily see browning. Even a stainless pot, with a copper layer, or a heavy aluminum pot can work. Mass of the cooking vessel does make a difference in your ability to produce consistent results.

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