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First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't eyeball, use a scale.

Second, the swirl method produces slightly thicker crepes, like Swabian Flädle. If you want a true thin French crepe, you should use a T shaped tool for spreading the batter. It does need some practice, but it's learnable in a reasonable time. If you instead stay with the swirl method, even with the proper consistency, the bottom layer of the batter will bake before you've swirled the top, so you need sufficient batter to allow for that, as senschen said.

The lacy edge is also common with swirling, although proper consistency reduced it too. It also depends on good swirling technique, if you can hit an angle where the batter doesn't climb the pan wall, you don't get the lace. What makes it worse are pans with sloping sides, instead of straight ones (less hot) or real crepe pans without walls. Also, gas makes it worse, because it warms the pan sides. Again, if you want your crepes to be that close to the original ( thickness, no lacy edge, proper Browning, etc) you should use proper tools and not a random pan without a spreader.

First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't eyeball, use a scale.

Second, the swirl method produces slightly thicker crepes, like Swabian Flädle. If you want a true thin French crepe, you should use a T shaped tool for spreading the batter. It does need some practice, but it's learnable in a reasonable time. If you instead stay with the swirl method, even with the proper consistency, the bottom layer of the batter will bake before you've swirled the top, so you need sufficient batter to allow for that, as senschen said.

First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't eyeball, use a scale.

Second, the swirl method produces slightly thicker crepes, like Swabian Flädle. If you want a true thin French crepe, you should use a T shaped tool for spreading the batter. It does need some practice, but it's learnable in a reasonable time. If you instead stay with the swirl method, even with the proper consistency, the bottom layer of the batter will bake before you've swirled the top, so you need sufficient batter to allow for that, as senschen said.

The lacy edge is also common with swirling, although proper consistency reduced it too. It also depends on good swirling technique, if you can hit an angle where the batter doesn't climb the pan wall, you don't get the lace. What makes it worse are pans with sloping sides, instead of straight ones (less hot) or real crepe pans without walls. Also, gas makes it worse, because it warms the pan sides. Again, if you want your crepes to be that close to the original ( thickness, no lacy edge, proper Browning, etc) you should use proper tools and not a random pan without a spreader.

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First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't eyeball, use a scale.

Second, the swirl method produces slightly thicker crepes, like Swabian Flädle. If you want a true thin French crepe, you should use a T shaped tool for spreading the batter. It does need some practice, but it's learnable in a reasonable time. If you instead stay with the swirl method, even with the proper consistency, the bottom layer of the batter will bake before you've swirled the top, so you need sufficient batter to allow for that, as senschen said.