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[See below re possible dup]

I've seen recipes for fish and chips call for the use of a CO2 syphon for the batter (looking at you, Heston!). So I'm looking to buy a syphon (I don't have one yet).

I haven't seen explicit comments in any of the recipes as to whether it should be a "soda syphon" or a "cream whipper" but they are explicit about use of CO2.

Most of the product web pages suggest CO2 & N2O aren't interchangeable. I'm not sure if thats due to physical limitations of the devices, or just in the interest of avoiding funny tasting whipped cream or weird looking "soda"!

Soda syphons seem to be a lot cheaper, but I'm doubtful if they would handle fish batter well - presumably they are designed for less viscous liquids like water.

Can one use CO2 cartridges in 'cream whipper' syphons? They latter would seem better suited to the texture of the batter.

I understand (slightly, anyway) the various issues around taste / texture etc between CO2 and N2O; but have no idea if the cartridges are physically compatible, or if there are critical pressure differences.


This was flagged as possible dup of question about interchangeability of CO2 and N2O cartridges. I don't think it is. As one of the comments here says, I have specifc use in mind.

I had looked at that question and, unless I misread it, the answers are mainly about the chemistry, as it were, and not the mechanics of the syphons. They seem to imply that the cartridges are (often) interchangeable; but many of the product web sites say specifically to use one type or the other, but they don't make it clear if that to do with the device or the recipe, as it were. (Sorry for long explanation here; If I were able to comment on others' questions Id put the comment on the other post).

I've seen recipes for fish and chips call for the use of a CO2 syphon for the batter (looking at you, Heston!). So I'm looking to buy a syphon (I don't have one yet).

I haven't seen explicit comments in any of the recipes as to whether it should be a "soda syphon" or a "cream whipper" but they are explicit about use of CO2.

Most of the product web pages suggest CO2 & N2O aren't interchangeable. I'm not sure if thats due to physical limitations of the devices, or just in the interest of avoiding funny tasting whipped cream or weird looking "soda"!

Soda syphons seem to be a lot cheaper, but I'm doubtful if they would handle fish batter well - presumably they are designed for less viscous liquids like water.

Can one use CO2 cartridges in 'cream whipper' syphons? They latter would seem better suited to the texture of the batter.

I understand (slightly, anyway) the various issues around taste / texture etc between CO2 and N2O; but have no idea if the cartridges are physically compatible, or if there are critical pressure differences.

[See below re possible dup]

I've seen recipes for fish and chips call for the use of a CO2 syphon for the batter (looking at you, Heston!). So I'm looking to buy a syphon (I don't have one yet).

I haven't seen explicit comments in any of the recipes as to whether it should be a "soda syphon" or a "cream whipper" but they are explicit about use of CO2.

Most of the product web pages suggest CO2 & N2O aren't interchangeable. I'm not sure if thats due to physical limitations of the devices, or just in the interest of avoiding funny tasting whipped cream or weird looking "soda"!

Soda syphons seem to be a lot cheaper, but I'm doubtful if they would handle fish batter well - presumably they are designed for less viscous liquids like water.

Can one use CO2 cartridges in 'cream whipper' syphons? They latter would seem better suited to the texture of the batter.

I understand (slightly, anyway) the various issues around taste / texture etc between CO2 and N2O; but have no idea if the cartridges are physically compatible, or if there are critical pressure differences.


This was flagged as possible dup of question about interchangeability of CO2 and N2O cartridges. I don't think it is. As one of the comments here says, I have specifc use in mind.

I had looked at that question and, unless I misread it, the answers are mainly about the chemistry, as it were, and not the mechanics of the syphons. They seem to imply that the cartridges are (often) interchangeable; but many of the product web sites say specifically to use one type or the other, but they don't make it clear if that to do with the device or the recipe, as it were. (Sorry for long explanation here; If I were able to comment on others' questions Id put the comment on the other post).

2 Removed too broad "extra" questions
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I've seen recipes for fish and chips call for the use of a CO2 syphon for the batter (looking at you, Heston!). So I'm looking to buy a syphon (I don't have one yet).

I haven't seen explicit comments in any of the recipes as to whether it should be a "soda syphon" or a "cream whipper" but they are explicit about use of CO2.

Most of the product web pages suggest CO2 & N2O aren't interchangeable. I'm not sure if thats due to physical limitations of the devices, or just in the interest of avoiding funny tasting whipped cream or weird looking "soda"!

Soda syphons seem to be a lot cheaper, but I'm doubtful if they would handle fish batter well - presumably they are designed for less viscous liquids like water.

Can one use CO2 cartridges in 'cream whipper' syphons? They latter would seem better suited to the texture of the batter.

I understand (slightly, anyway) the various issues around taste / texture etc between CO2 and N2O; but have no idea if the cartridges are physically compatible, or if there are critical pressure differences.

Aside from fish batter - what are the most popular uses for syphons? I don't see using it for whipped cream per se, I can use a whisk! But I can see experimenting a bit with other foams.

I'm new here, so please be kind (I had a rough intro to Stack Overflow a while back but recovered!) ... is it Ok to ask for brand recommendations? As this is a new thing for me Id be looking at low to medium budget ideally.

I've seen recipes for fish and chips call for the use of a CO2 syphon for the batter (looking at you, Heston!). So I'm looking to buy a syphon (I don't have one yet).

I haven't seen explicit comments in any of the recipes as to whether it should be a "soda syphon" or a "cream whipper" but they are explicit about use of CO2.

Most of the product web pages suggest CO2 & N2O aren't interchangeable. I'm not sure if thats due to physical limitations of the devices, or just in the interest of avoiding funny tasting whipped cream or weird looking "soda"!

Soda syphons seem to be a lot cheaper, but I'm doubtful if they would handle fish batter well - presumably they are designed for less viscous liquids like water.

Can one use CO2 cartridges in 'cream whipper' syphons? They latter would seem better suited to the texture of the batter.

I understand (slightly, anyway) the various issues around taste / texture etc between CO2 and N2O; but have no idea if the cartridges are physically compatible, or if there are critical pressure differences.

Aside from fish batter - what are the most popular uses for syphons? I don't see using it for whipped cream per se, I can use a whisk! But I can see experimenting a bit with other foams.

I'm new here, so please be kind (I had a rough intro to Stack Overflow a while back but recovered!) ... is it Ok to ask for brand recommendations? As this is a new thing for me Id be looking at low to medium budget ideally.

I've seen recipes for fish and chips call for the use of a CO2 syphon for the batter (looking at you, Heston!). So I'm looking to buy a syphon (I don't have one yet).

I haven't seen explicit comments in any of the recipes as to whether it should be a "soda syphon" or a "cream whipper" but they are explicit about use of CO2.

Most of the product web pages suggest CO2 & N2O aren't interchangeable. I'm not sure if thats due to physical limitations of the devices, or just in the interest of avoiding funny tasting whipped cream or weird looking "soda"!

Soda syphons seem to be a lot cheaper, but I'm doubtful if they would handle fish batter well - presumably they are designed for less viscous liquids like water.

Can one use CO2 cartridges in 'cream whipper' syphons? They latter would seem better suited to the texture of the batter.

I understand (slightly, anyway) the various issues around taste / texture etc between CO2 and N2O; but have no idea if the cartridges are physically compatible, or if there are critical pressure differences.

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