0

I made chicken in peanut butter sauce. Similar to this question, it split.

I used chicken stock, peanut butter, honey and soy sauce, and cooked the chicken in it.

Shortening cooking time isn't an option, since the chicken needs to be done. Honey present in the sauce, as the answer to the other question suggested to improve emulsification.

My mother makes the same recipe regularly, with no problem. The only difference is she uses Skippy, whereas I used pure peanut butter. Would that be the culprit? How can I compensate for that, if that is indeed the culprit, if I want to avoid the innumerable strange additives present in Skippy?

  • The answer to the other question also suggest adding the sauce at the last minute to the chicken, is that not a solution to your problem? – Juliana Karasawa Souza Sep 18 '19 at 7:46
  • @JulianaKarasawaSouza Umm, I'm cooking the chicken in the sauce. Not pre-marinading it in the sauce though. – Galastel supports GoFundMonica Sep 18 '19 at 16:18
  • But adding at the last minute means literally at the last minute, when the chicken is in the last 3-4 minutes of cooking. You only let the sauce warm up to get to the overall dish temperature and remove it from heat – Juliana Karasawa Souza Sep 19 '19 at 7:36
  • @JulianaKarasawaSouza But then what do I cook the chicken in? If I don't have a sauce there, I'll just get burnt chicken. – Galastel supports GoFundMonica Sep 19 '19 at 7:50
  • You can cook in the sauce minus peanut butter and add only the peanut butter at the last minute – Juliana Karasawa Souza Sep 19 '19 at 8:17
4

To address the part where you asked for the difference between your mother's sauce and yours: yes, the kind of peanut butter may well be responsible for the difference. The Internet gives the ingredients as

ROASTED PEANUTS, SUGAR, HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OILS (COTTONSEED, SOYBEAN AND RAPESEED) TO PREVENT SEPARATION, SALT

or, for a low-fat version

INGREDIENTS: ROASTED PEANUTS, CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, SUGAR, SOY PROTEIN, SALT, HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OILS (COTTONSEED, SOYBEAN AND RAPESEED) TO PREVENT SEPARATION, MONO AND DIGLYCERIDES, MINERALS (MAGNESIUM OXIDE, ZINC OXIDE, FERRIC ORTHOPHOSPHATE, COPPER SULFATE), VITAMINS (NIACINAMIDE, PYRIDOXIDE HYDROCHLORIDE, FOLIC ADIC).

Your mother is using a product which has been specifically engineered to prevent separation. Especially the low-fat version also includes mono- and diglycerides, which are also a good emulsifier. You are using some product whose selling point is probably the low degree of processing. I suspect that it is not only the ingredient difference, but also the microstructure of the fat particles that play a role (the two may have been milled differently).

So, one option would be to use Skippy too. It would likely get you the result your mother gets.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Adding an emulsifier or simply blending the sauce would probably work too. – GdD Sep 18 '19 at 15:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.