1

I've recently started preparing matcha latte at home, I bought matcha powder and I proceed as follows:

  1. Put 2 tsp of matcha powder in a cup through a sieve
  2. Add 2 tsp of brown sugar
  3. Add 2 tbsp of hot (below boiling) water
  4. Stir the whole thing with a fork for a couple of minutes
  5. Add boiling water to almost fill the cup, then add milk to taste

the result is very good but I find myself constantly stirring it to prevent it from depositing on the bottom of the cup. If I don't stir it all the time I get a very light taste at the beginning and a very strong taste at the end.

The question is: how can I prepare matcha latte so that it doesn't deposit on the bottom of my cup?

(apparently I am not able to create new tags from the mobile app, I would have used "green-tea" and "matcha")

  • Just a side comment, you need 300 points of reputation to be able to create tags. You may use the already existing tags, but not create new ones – Juliana Karasawa Souza Oct 15 '19 at 8:00
3

Matcha doesn't dissolve.

It is very finely ground to be suspended in water after very vigorous whisking when the preparation is done the traditional way.

A few tips for your matcha latte:

  • Use good, high quality matcha. High quality matcha is bright green and a very fine powder (almost like confectioner's sugar or cornstarch) - this helps keeping it suspended in liquid
  • Whisk very vigorously with the appropriate tools. Traditional tea ceremony uses a bamboo whisk with a lot of room in the bowl to make sure the tea is very well suspended and aerated, and the fork is not the best tool for that. Use a fouet and prepare in a bowl or, if possible, use a blender (a bullet blender or immersion blender would work for small quantities). If all things fail, even a nutritional supplement shaker (the one that has a wire ball inside to help dissolve whey) would be more effective.

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