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Are these mushrooms still edible? The colour of the gills changed.

I'm not sure what kind of mushrooms they are. They're not store-bought though, my mother picked them from the forest. She also washed them straight away. They've been stored in the refrigerator for 5 days. No off-odour. Gill's colour changed from light brown to dark brown-black.

mushrooms

  • What kind of mushroom are they, how were they stored and how long? – Stephie Oct 18 '19 at 19:32
  • I'm not sure what kind of mushrooms they are. They're not store-bought though, my mother picked them from the forest. She also washed them straight away. They've been stored in the refrigerator for 5 days. No off-odour. Gills's colour changed from light brown to dark brown-black. – TheLostInUnknown Oct 18 '19 at 20:25
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    I would think this is unanswerable. Wild collected mushrooms of unknown variety regardless of how they are stored or their condition cannot honestly be called safe from a picture. This is a high risk item without the facts. – dlb Oct 18 '19 at 20:50
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    Gill darkening is pretty normal over time. Slimey feel, dry spots and other fungi growing on your shrooms are the big danger signs. – Wayfaring Stranger Oct 19 '19 at 23:30
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    All mushrooms are edible, some only once... In all seriousness, if you don't EXACLTY how to identify a Deathcap, don't pick and eat wild mushrooms. This advice may vary with location (for example, eating wild mushrooms is common in some parts of Asia known not to have the dangerous varieties--but even then, how do you know some evil American hasn't smuggled some in?) – Lee Daniel Crocker Nov 7 '19 at 20:47
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No - not edible, is the only responsible answer to this question. From the given information and photo, it's impossible for someone on these message boards to positively identify what you have.

The saying is "When in doubt, throw it out". As with all foraged mushrooms, don't eat it if you are not able to 100% positively identify it. This goes for fresh and as well as 5-day refrigerated specimens.

My background: 3 years experience foraging local wild fungi in midwestern USA and scientific fungi identification.

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