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I have a cutlery set that came with 7 teaspoons. Six of them are the same, but one is different. In the following image I have three of the six on the left side of the picture and the different one on the right.

enter image description here

Unfortunately I don't have the box the set came in, but on the back of all the cutlery it says "justinus edelstahl 18-10". I was unable to find information online about what teaspoon that is.

What is the one on the right used for? Why does it have a flat tip? And why was there only one in the set?

The set was for 6 people, so I have 6 spoons, 6 knifes, 6 forks, 6 little forks, 6 (normal) teaspoons, a few other things, and this strange teaspoon. It had its own special place in the set, so it is not a defect. And it doesn't look cut or chopped or smoothed. It was created like that. It definitely had its purpose.

  • It's been chopped! i.stack.imgur.com/ouPwq.jpg Or maybe just smoothed up after having been dropped in the garbage disposal. – CrossRoads Nov 1 at 14:09
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    Could it be a defect? Was it from an expensive set? – Luciano Nov 1 at 14:30
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    it looks like a roux spoon, but if it's teaspoon sized it's too small... – Luciano Nov 1 at 15:10
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    I would suspect a sugar spoon or maybe even a jam spoon though those are often even smaller than tea spoons. I have seen both with blunt ends, I have always guessed for getting to the bottom of jars and bowls. Mostly very old ones when I have seen them and often without the rounded spoon, more of a flared shape. But in old sets I have seen many different shapes for them. Scalloped seems very popular for sugar with the blunt end being more rare. – dlb Nov 1 at 15:19
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    Maybe you can write to Justinus (www.justinus.de) and ask them (Justinus being the brand, "Edelstahl 18-10" just means this is stainless steel) ? – Eike Pierstorff Nov 1 at 15:52
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Like dlb suggested it is a spoon for sugar. At least in Germany this type of spoon is not uncommon with sets of cuttlery.

Update:

For an impression of various forms of spoons check a picture search. I searched for "Zuckerlöffel" (German for sugar spoon) and found a wide range of different forms.

As for the specific form I don't think there is a special reason other for having a different looking spoon that fits the design of the cutlery set.

Historically sugar spoons where of a complete different design than your everyday cutlery as sugar was quite expensive and not used everyday. There are even examples of sugar pots that have small locks on them so that the servants weren't able to nick some sugar if laying the table.

  • This explains why there was only one in the set. But why does it have a flat shape? – Pips Nov 2 at 10:22
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    @Pips the spoon has the same form as all the other teaspoons. By having the sugar spoon chopped, you can't accidently exchange it with the regular ones which are used for stirring your coffee. – eckes Nov 2 at 12:33
  • Additionally, the flat edge allows for a smoother flow of the sugar, and fits better on the sugar container. – Morts Nov 7 at 7:32
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It's a jelly/jam spoon, according to a site that explains antique flatware.

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    Could you please add a source? “A site” is quite vague? – Stephie Nov 7 at 16:54

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