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Has anyone tried Mexican oregano as a substitute for marjoram? I have a recipe for marinated ancho chiles, and the recipe calls for thyme and marjoram. I live in Latvia, finding marjoram is impossible- but I do have a big bag of mexican oregano

  • Lab dien @IvanValdez. – GdD Feb 2 at 14:06
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    Are you sure you can't get marjoram? Google says it's called "majorāns" in Latvian. It ought to be much easier to obtain in Latvia than Mexican oregano. – Marti Feb 3 at 2:08
  • @Marti +1. Marjoram is widely used in Finland, which is just around the corner, I can't imagine it would be difficult to find in Latvia. Do you need it fresh or dried? – lambshaanxy Feb 3 at 2:38
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    Does this answer your question? Substitute for marjoram – Marti Feb 3 at 5:49
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See Substitute for marjoram - which says you can substitute oregano. The thing is, that Mexican oregano isn't actually oregano at all, but a completely unrelated plant that tastes a bit like oregano… though not enough to actually be confused if you have them side by side.

I'm surprised, if you're living in mainland Europe, that you can get Mexican oregano but not European or indeed marjoram. I'm in the UK where European oregano is all you can find in supermarkets - I have to buy my Mexican specially imported online.

I used to make Mexican food using European oregano for years, until I discovered the difference. Now I'm aware of it, I never swap one for the other.

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    I frankly find it very surprising that OP can't find marjoram. When I lived in Poland, it was ubiquitous. Latvia is not so far away. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas Feb 3 at 1:59
  • Most places, "mexican oregano" isn't actually Lippia graveolens. It's just regular Origanum vulgare grown in Mexico or Central America. – FuzzyChef Feb 7 at 0:31

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