0

I have two bread recipes I use frequently. recipe one is a type of flat bread called taftan, and the second recipe is called barbari. Taftan is griddled while barbari is baked in the oven. As for the amount of water, what I usually do is adding water until it forms a dough that is only slightly sticky.

Recipe one:
3 cups flour
0.5 tsp salt
2 tsp instant yeast
1 ts sugar
Lukewarm water

enter image description here

Recipe two:
3 cups flour
0.5 tsp salt
2 tsp instant yeast
1 ts sugar
1.5 tsp baking powder
Lukewarm water

enter image description here

The only difference is baking powder that one of those recipes calls for. But they result in totally different breads, with respect to both taste and appearance. I wonder what makes a bread different. Is it the shaping method you use, rising, proofing? Even when the ingredients are identical, why do the tastes differ so much?

  • 3
    can you edit the question to give some information about your making and cooking methods for your two breads? I assume the flatbread is griddled and the Barbari seems to be baked and is, according to wikipedia known as one of the thickest of all flatbreads, so there seem to be obvious differences there. I mean, you wouldn't expect a fried egg and a baked egg to come out the same. – Spagirl Mar 13 at 14:44
  • Also, you didn't specify the amount of water added in the dough. This is known as the hydration of the dough and is a key parameter. (It's typically measured as a percentage of the weight of the flour, meaning that a recipe with 500g of flour and 300g of water will have a hydration of 60%.) – Popup Mar 13 at 15:49
  • @Spagirl: Ah I see your point, one being baked and the other one griddled. I was more thinking about the differences there are in the ingredients and I was amazed that those two recipes are identical (except for the baking powder). Well, I'll try to update my question and add more information. – Gigili Mar 13 at 16:55
0

I think it is "all of the above"

including oven type, flour type, yeast type, water ...

In the case of Barbari bread, it seems, in most recipes that I have seen, to have extra flavoring like sesame seed.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.