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To make pizza dough, I'm trying to measure 750 grams of flour. However, I don't have access to any weight measurement tool or any standard cup. I have this mug as unit of measurement. I wonder how many of this mug would roughly be 750 grams of flour?

mug

Cup diameter is 7 cm

enter image description here

Cup height is 8 cm

enter image description here

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    There's no possible way to give you an answer to this, you need to give a volume measurement of the cup. – GdD Jun 4 '20 at 10:29
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    Two issues: the walls of the cup aren't straight, and the 7cm measurement is taken between the outer edges of the cup. I think the inner diameter is about 6.4cm, which (treating the cup as a cylinder) gives a volume of about 250mL (no point in being more precise). Do you have no containers of which you know the volume? Or do you perhaps know the total mass of the flour you have? – LSchoon Jun 4 '20 at 10:51
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    If you want good results you need some decent measuring equipment, which isn't hard to find. Invest in a measuring cup and a scale, guesswork will lead to inconsistent results. – GdD Jun 4 '20 at 10:57
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    @LSchoon and 250ml would probably be close enough to count as 1 cup, considering the variance introduced by the different flour measuring methods. – Stephie Jun 4 '20 at 12:48
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    Does this answer your question? Standard weight conversions for converting cups of flour to grams of flour? – Damila Jun 4 '20 at 17:39
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Buy a 500g pack of flour. Fill the cup with flour and measure how many cups can fill 500g of flour. You can then do simple math to understand the weight of flour each cup is holding.

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    also: for 750g of flour just use 1 1/2 packets, doesn't even need the cup! – Luciano Jun 4 '20 at 12:19
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    Or if flour is sold in 1kg packs (like where I live), do the exercise with that. – Stephie Jun 4 '20 at 12:46
  • @Stephie: First divide the pack into two, then divide one of the halves into two, then take one half and one half of half and you've got yourself 750g. Alternatively, divide the 1kg pack to 1000 equal parts, then take 750 of them. – Ink blot Jun 5 '20 at 15:27
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Here it is mentioned that :

serving density | 0.58 g/cm^3 (grams per cubic centimeter)

Therefore, based on the reported dimensions, the flour weight would be:

pi / 4 * 7 * 7 * 8 * 0.58 = 178.568 grams

For a more precise answer, the cup dimensions should be measured with more precision.


Thanks to @Damila and this post.

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    This answer only addresses one of the problems of your previous answer (why didn't you just edit that one, by the way?), namely the conversion of volume to mass. The 'serving density' as WolframAlpha calls it can vary wildly depending on how tightly you pack your cup. It also still has the inaccurate calculation of the cup's volume. The advice to invest in a scale is still the best response. – LSchoon Jun 5 '20 at 7:25
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    @LSchoon Right ☺️ I'm going to buy a scale. – user3405291 Jun 5 '20 at 9:47
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On this website it is mentioned:

enter image description here

Therefore, 4.25 ounces of flour might weight 120 grams. Also it is known that 4.25 ounces is 0.0001256875 cubic meters:

enter image description here

My cup volume is:

pi / 4 * 7 * 7 * 8 * 10^-6 = 0.00030787608 cubic meters

Therefore reach cup would weigh around:

0.00030787608 / 0.0001256875 * 120 = 293.944342914 grams

Please let me know if my calculations are missing something!

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    Buy a scale. Seriously, they cost very little and you will be able to bake with precision. – GdD Jun 4 '20 at 10:59
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    You are overestimating your cup volume by around 20%. As I said in a previous comment on the question: the walls of the cup are not perfectly straight (the cup is smaller at the bottom) and the 7cm you measured include the walls of the cup, which seem about 3mm wide. Other than that, as other people have said, get a scale. – LSchoon Jun 4 '20 at 11:08
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    There is another problem: the 4.25 ounces given by King Arthur is the mass of 1 cup of flour, not the volume. 1 cup = 8 fl. oz = about 236 mL. Thus, even if your calculation for the volume of the cup is roughly OK, your final mass is off by almost a factor 2! – LSchoon Jun 4 '20 at 11:15
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    In short, fluid ounces ≠ ounces, unless we are measuring water. For everything else, this will cause a more or less significant error. Flour has (very roughly) half the density of water -> factor 2. Find more here. – Stephie Jun 4 '20 at 12:38
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    This answer needs to be changed. It takes one problem and compounds. it with totally incorrect information. Even setting side all the problems with variation between weights of flour of the same volume, even this answer confuses fluid ounces (ounces used as a volume measurement) and ounces (weight, mass really). 1 cup = 8 fluid ounces. In flour, that weighs about 4.25 ounces. – Damila Jun 4 '20 at 17:31

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