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I've made a ton of mayo now with egg + lemon juice or vinegar + spices + oil and it got me thinking about sweet emulsions

I've been putting my savory mayo with various spices on rice and its quite nice so I'm thinking about trying to make a sweet emulsion of egg and butter with a sweet juice and maybe some sugar or other sweetener and trying it out on oatmeal!

Butter which is commonly used when you need something oily to go with sweet + eggs + a sweet fruit juice or something else sugary and sweet, maple syrup, agave, whatever you can think of, I can't find anything about this while googling. I tried "sweet mayo" and it comes up with sweeter types of mayo but not stuff I'd want to put on oatmeal.

The closest thing I can find is hollandaise sauce but that is traditionally savory as far as I can tell?

I found a newspaper from 1964 with "grape hollandaise" during my research, it's intended to be more savory though, still neat.

Are there any established sweet emulsions to put on foods that like sweet sauces? If not then what emulsions I can make to put on oatmeal or other foods that enjoy sweet sauces, pancakes, waffles, etc?

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    Sweet emulsion, sounds line an Aerosmith song. – GdD Sep 17 '20 at 12:46
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    You can certainly make lemon flavoured mayonnaise by substituting lemon in for vinegar. You could presumably sweeten this by dissolving sugar in the lemon juice prior to making the emulsion. How sweet it would be is another matter, but you can get to at least 50% sucrose solution in water with a bit of heating. – bob1 Sep 17 '20 at 21:03
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    What about something along the lines of whipped, flavoured cream? – bob1 Sep 17 '20 at 21:06
  • GdD: sweet emulsion would make a good parody song of sweet emotion haha Bob1: lemon is commonly used for mayo instead of vinegar in some recopies! I believe it would be better to start with a hollandase sauce like base, which is lemon juice egg and melted butter, and try to sweeten it! however I was really interested if t here was any tradition of sweet emulsions of eggs and butter that I could draw on before experimenting! – user87639 Sep 18 '20 at 3:14
  • Try liquid coconut oil in your sweet emulsion (if you like coconut flavor). It adds a very slight sweet taste and an aroma that's usually associated with sweetness. – Elmy Sep 22 '20 at 6:26
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The only thing that comes to mind right now is Zabaione.

Or you could try making some sort of more liquid custard or curd

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  • thanks! theres no way I would have found that on my own, very interesting. I have considered trying out curds and custards as well but the thing I like about egg liquid and oil emulsions is that I don't technically have to cook them, all i need to do is get out my stick blender and vrooom I will update if I experiment and discover something tasty – user87639 Sep 17 '20 at 10:09
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    An important note on the rawness of mayo. The vinegar/lemon/etc is used to acidify the egg yolk emulsion to minimize bacterial/microbial contamination. I think you'll find that un-savory options tend to trade acid for cooking. – AMtwo Sep 17 '20 at 12:05
  • thats a good point, I am not sure how much an acid actually helps with upfront decontamination, its hard to find an answer from a trusted source. I read: "While the acid doesn't kill bacteria, it does reduce their growth by a lot (especially the un-dissociated acids) even at those relatively small amounts taste is also a factor. It's the only factor when you're using the mayo in a few days, but if you keep it for longer the acid gets important for the preservation." which sounds like it makes sense but it wasn't from any sort of authority on the subject. I believe cooking is good to be safe. – user87639 Sep 18 '20 at 3:29
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You can also look at French, German, and Swiss buttercreams. There's some cooking involved, but you can control the amount of sweetness and acid. I actually made a lemon frosting that reminded me of a sweetened mayonnaise more than anything. :)

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