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I made a deep-fried Mars bar today. When I was initially lowering it in the oil I held it with tongs, and when I released, the part where the tongs were touching had left the chocolate exposed. I hurriedly fished it back out, holding it by another part (already slightly crisped by then) and dipped it back in the batter to seal the exposed part. It worked ok but I couldn't help thinking there's a better way.

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    Don't you mean a batter way? – GdD Nov 23 '20 at 11:47
  • You must be from Scotland. – FuzzyChef Nov 27 '20 at 6:20
  • @FuzzyChef what an odd assumption to make. If I was asking about how to make cannelloni would you assume I'm Italian? – Chris A Nov 27 '20 at 9:04
  • No, because if you were Italian you'd already know how to make cannelloni. – FuzzyChef Nov 28 '20 at 5:03
  • By that logic if I were Scottish I'd already know how to make deep fried Mars bars. – Chris A Nov 28 '20 at 9:34
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Put in on a stick. Depending on the size of the bar a toothpick may be sufficient. Just make sure the batter covers the stick a little where it goes into the bar.

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    Mars bars are a bit too big for a cocktail stick. A natural bamboo or wooden skewer would work better. – spikey_richie Nov 23 '20 at 20:20
  • Mars bars come in different sizes, a toothpick would be just right for a “Fun Size” bar. – Debbie M. Nov 23 '20 at 23:30
  • Then update your answer to include the different bar sizes, and available support mechanisms. – spikey_richie Nov 24 '20 at 8:06
  • @spikey_richie Use two toothpicks, hold them parallel with the floor, dip the bar into the oil by going perpendicular with the floor, and wiggle out the toothpicks once submerged in the oil. – MonkeyZeus Nov 24 '20 at 17:51
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    @DebbieM. I ask you: "What's so 'fun' about a tiny, little candy bar?" – Greg Nickoloff Nov 25 '20 at 19:05
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Dunk the tongs in the batter too, or use your fingers. It should just kind of seal itself then, as you let go.

Watch an experienced traditional chip-shop owner putting the fish in*. Fish & fingers go in the batter, fish is gently laid in the fryer, fingers are kept cool by the batter. You never see any remaining finger-holes left in the batter by doing it this way.

*or a traditional tempura chef if you've never been in a British chippy, though I'd have thought you must have at least seen a Glaswegian one if you're doing the Mars bars;)

Just for fun, if no-one gets the references , including those in the comments below…

enter image description here

Also see Stonner Kebab and Deep Fried Mars Bar

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    Chris - I've done fish myself (under expert supervision) in a mini fryer, though it was a commercial portable made for the task. If you can't reach in to retrieve it, I'd put a basket or even a sieve in first, so the lift is easier. – Tetsujin Nov 23 '20 at 11:51
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    I already use the basket, I probably just need to use the fingers rather than tongs when lowering in. The thought of actually putting my fingers in the oil (even with batter on) seems like a hospital visit waiting to happen though! – Chris A Nov 23 '20 at 12:02
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    Batter doesn't spurt much @ChrisA, the water is trapped in the batter you see. You have to be careful with anything frozen though, always drop frozen chips or fries in using the basket. – GdD Nov 23 '20 at 12:06
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    Can I ask, in your three steps "Fish & fingers go in the batter, fish is gently laid in the fryer, fingers are kept cool by the batter" are you saying that in the third it's OK for your batter-coated fingers to come in contact with the oil? The idea scares me and I'm sure I'm not alone... – AakashM Nov 23 '20 at 16:20
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    I'm not entirely sure that the fingers are well protected. I have a friend who, some years ago, used to work at the grill station in a fast food place. She has permanently lost some sensitivity in her fingers because of handling of too hot food on a regular basis - not as much as to count herself disabled, but she is no longer as flink in knitting as she used to be, for example. – rumtscho Nov 23 '20 at 16:38

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