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When I was breading I had some leftovers so I decided to mix them together and fry to check if it is edible. It wasn't bad though it was very dense.

Today I tried to make it from scratch and add baking powder. I got something similar to pancake or omelette. I presume recipe is simple enough that humans discovered it long time ago and it has name.

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If you fried it in oil, it’s a type of latke. Breadcrumb latkes actually predate the potato latkes which are common today, as potatoes are a ‘new world’ crop

If it’s just cooked on a griddle or in a pan, then you might consider it to be a pancake, but depending on the stiffness of the batter and the ratio of eggs to starch, it might be closer to a dumpling (semmelknödel or pisarei), croquette or even a mini frittata.

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I'd say "pancake" is indeed the correct name.

For something as simple as a pancake the number of different recipes is astonishing. You'll find variations with more or less eggs, with or without whipping the eggs, with or without baking powder, with or without added milk or water, sweet and savory variations. Some recipes substitute some flour with starch or other ingredients like coconut or almond flour.

Adding bread crumbs isn't anything I read in a recipe before, but I doubt it makes too much of a difference to call the result anything else but a "pancake".

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Leave out the flour, boil it in chicken broth and you've got some matzah ball soup!

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  • Both the latke and matzoh ball soup are traditionally made with matzoh meal, which is finely ground matzoh, an unleavened bread of Jewish origin. Bread crumbs and flour can be substituted but they are not ingredients in the original recipe. Depending on the OP’s ratio of ingredients , this could be some type of patties or biscuits.
    – suse
    Jan 20 at 13:29

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