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Apparently people (esp the British) use rusk in making fresh sausage rather than breadcrumbs because it's a "yeastless bread". The yeast is meant to be bad for the sausage. However:

  1. When I make bread, I cook it to an internal temp of at least 190F. Doesn't that kill all the yeast?
  2. Adding (alcoholic) cider, wine etc to sausages seems common. Doesn't that have yeast in it too?

Is yeast actually detrimental to a sausage in any way?

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    I'm not sure quite what you are asking here. Yes, baking bread kills the yeast. Yes, alcohol has yeast, though it should have been removed before sale. Breadcrumbs, being from baked bread, also has dead yeast… so what's your actual question?
    – unlisted
    Feb 6 at 12:02
  • Interesting, I had not heard of this before. Is the reason for using rusk because of the yeast, or because of some other characteristic (drier, e.g.)?
    – Erica
    Feb 6 at 14:14
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    I don't see a question here, and I don't think the premise is right. I've never heard anyone say that yeast is bad for the sausage. Rusk is a flavorless bread that's quick and cheap to make, with good absorbing properties.
    – GdD
    Feb 6 at 16:09
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    The question is really "is yeast OK in sausage?" I've read in some places that its bad. Rusk can absorb more water per weight, but I think that's just because it's drier - ultimately they're both wheat-based breads.
    – lunix
    Feb 7 at 2:14
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None of those things have significant amounts of live or sporulated yeast. All flour-based baked goods are cooked to a temperature that will kill yeast; wine and cider are filtered and have preservatives added. Moreover, bread yeast is essentially inactive at refrigerator temperature.

Biscuit rusk is quicker and more efficient to make than bread rusk, and is more economical as a filler because it absorbs more water. Yeast is not a factor in the quality or longevity of fresh sausages.

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  • I think I'd agree on the bread yeast - quite possibly the comments I've seen saying breadcrumbs are bad are misinformed. I don't think all wine and cider are filtered, but I take your point.
    – lunix
    Feb 7 at 2:17

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