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I thought I signed up before writing that post, but I can't edit it! Sorry for screwing up. I want to provide details here. Thank you so far for assistance!

I used that pan JUST on Electric Cook Top in my house. I never knew overheating can damage non-stick surface! Someone asked how do I heat it? I usually oil the surface with Sunflower or Safflower Oil — because they have high smoke points! I usually just use medium or medium high heat. SOMETIMES I crank up the cooktop to max heat — if the pan holds many ingredients and the food is cooking too slowly — or if I want to stir fry rice, noodles, vegetables, seafood like Asians.

At max or high heat, I NEVER leave the pan empty or dry on high heat!!! On low to medium heat, the pan can be empty or dry when I am offloading ingredients and onloading new ingredients. Like if I finish stir frying ginger and rice at high heat, I turn down cooktop to low heat. Then I pour out vegetables. Now pan is empty. Then I pour in my raw vegetables and crank back up to high heat.

Now I have a question. I paid $129.99 + 13% tax in Ontario Canada = $147 for this pan. Can someone fix this damage? Is it economical to fix? Or smarter to buy a new pan? I contacted Zwilling about a replacement.

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  • Hi Amir, I left only one of your questions here. First, we don't take more than one question per post. Second, the one you are asking would be a duplicate, we already have an older question about using a pan with damaged teflon coating, cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/66493/….
    – rumtscho
    Apr 16 '21 at 20:33
  • On a second thought, the "is it economical" part of the question is also a bit borderline, because it only applies to your specific locale and your specific pan, making it not useful for other people with damaged pans. So I changed the title to focus on whether it is possible - if you hear that it is, and what kind of service to look for, you can start researching prices in your area.
    – rumtscho
    Apr 16 '21 at 20:38
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    Also, about the two accounts: they can be merged. I cannot do it as a moderator, only employees can do it, and you have to request it yourself, if you want to: see cooking.stackexchange.com/help/merging-accounts.
    – rumtscho
    Apr 16 '21 at 20:52
  • See my comment under the answer to the previous question. That pan is not teflon. I imagine only Zwilling can answer this, as they know what it is coated with.
    – unlisted
    Apr 17 '21 at 7:09
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no you cannot practically repair teflon damage. In theory you could probably spray more teflon over it, but you would likely want an even coating, which would mean stripping the pan anyway. Plus, the teflon would be very hard to get a hold of, you'd need spraying equipment, and then a curing oven to bake it at something like 400°C.

Personally I don't recommend spending a ton of money on frying pans. The expensive pans don't really offer anything worthwhile over cheaper pans. You can get tri-ply teflon (brand) pans from ikea for $30-40. if you want high heat cooking I'd recommend stainles/carbon steel or cast iron

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There are companies which re-coat the pan (patching is not technically possible). I have not used them, but I have seen forum threads on the Internet where consumers were happy with the procedure.

Whether your pan is suitable will depend on its construction. You have to remove any plastic or wood handles before sending, metal can stay. Then they sandblast the old coating off, add new coating and "bake" it at very high temperatures. If the pan is so thin as to deform at these temperatures (I hope that an expensive Zwilling isn't), or if you cannot remove and then reattach any burnable/meltable handles, it won't work.

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