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I enjoy a nice garlic baguette so much, but I have to drink a pre-emptive, schedule 5, painkiller not to die from being so lactose intolerant. I was wondering if a solution can be found that does not include narcotics, maybe substitute the butter for margarine? I know the French would call it barbaric, but can you do it?

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  • The short answer is 'yes', but that makes your question a recipe request. Recipe requests are a bad fit for this sort of site, so your question will probably get closed. But searching online for 'vegan garlic bread' will give you lots of options.
    – dbmag9
    May 29 at 14:12
  • I'm actually more interested in how the sub affects the end product?
    – Neil Meyer
    May 29 at 14:13
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    If your question is 'what effect will replacing butter by margarine have on a garlic bread recipe', then that sounds like it will be on topic, but you need to edit your question title and body to reflect that. At present the question is just 'can you make vegan garlic bread', to which the answer is 'yes'.
    – dbmag9
    May 29 at 14:15
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    You can actually substitute both butter and margarine with olive oil. Tastes great!
    – suse
    Jun 1 at 4:03
  • Does this answer your question? Can I always use butter instead of margarine when baking?
    – miken32
    Jul 15 at 20:15
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Margarine will not impact the texture, and probably will not alter the end result dramatically. It, of course, is not butter, so as long as the flavor is fine with you. But, you also don't need butter or margarine. You can use olive oil. Sweat garlic in olive oil. Proceed from that point.

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  • I'd go with olive oil. I can buy read-to-bake garlic baguettes made with butter, or slightly cheaper "economy" ones with margarine, and there's quite a difference in flavour & mouthfeel. Olive oil is different to either but good in its own way (I've only made it with oil or butter in recent years)
    – Chris H
    Jun 1 at 8:28
  • As a former butter snob (and I missed trans-fat margarines as a side effect, yay) I can say that some of the current crop of non-butters (which notably don't tend to describe themselves as "margarine") are actually quite tolerable substitutes for the real thing. That would be unlikely to apply to "economy" commercial loaves, since on average the good non-butters cost MORE than actual butter.
    – Ecnerwal
    Jun 10 at 18:29

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