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In long trips i.e. over 3 hours long, I take some toasted break with either pb&j or something inside e.g. slices of turkey etc (toasted).
I wrap them with aluminium foil and place them inside those transparent food bags/freezer bags we use to for placing items in a fridge. The problem is that the toasted bread becomes very soggy.
Is there a way to prepare/wrap/store them that would be more fresh after few hours?

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  • i would do a bit of both answers, toast dark and cool longer for best results. Cool in the freezer to really dry it out...
    – dandavis
    Aug 19 at 23:02
  • @dandavis: If I put the toasted bread in the freezer (I suppose before applying pb&j) for instance, won't it be stale when I take it with me? When would a apply the pb&j then?
    – Jim
    Aug 20 at 10:56
  • related: cooking.stackexchange.com/q/18435/67
    – Joe
    Aug 22 at 17:57
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As has been stated, you are trapping moisture vapour. I don't think it is possible to perfectly preserve the texture of toast over a prolonged period, but you will improve matters by letting the toast fully cool before you construct your sandwich.

Edit: when cooling your toast it is helpful to prop it vertically rather than lying it down as the underside will still get soggy. A toast rack is the perfect way to do this, but you can also just prop the slices against each other like a little tent.

You may also consider wrapping your deli-meats and any salad items separately and only adding them to your sandwich when you are ready to eat.

Mayonnaise will also tend to make your toast soggy, particularly if you use a low-fat version with a higher water content. Butter/spread applied when the toast is cold should only have a minimal damping effect.

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  • How would you wrap it for carrying in a bag?
    – Jim
    Aug 21 at 15:59
  • What about if a toasty with slices of turkey or ham? I can really toast the turkey slice without the bread, and I don't think I can split it to cool it
    – Jim
    Aug 21 at 19:32
  • @jim some things just can’t be achieved. If you want a sandwich with toast to have a semblance of crunch after three hours wrapped up. If you are taking about a toasty with sealed edges I don’t think it can be done. You can try making some steam holes to help it cool, but I don’t think it would work well.
    – Spagirl
    Aug 22 at 19:22
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The issue is that you are trapping moisture with the foil and the plastic bag. I am not sure what you mean by "more fresh." If you want your toasted bread to be crunchy, like it just came out of the toaster, that is a challenge over a several hour time span. I think your best bet would be to toast a bit darker, and perhaps wrap in paper towel or napkin, loosely. This would help, but I don't think you'll be able to preserve the freshly toasted texture completely. Alternately, you could pack the toast (again, wrapped in a napkin) and sandwich filling separately, then build your sandwich when you are ready to eat it. That would also help, though may not be all that convenient.

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  • By more fresh I mean not to be soggy. If I use a napkin only, how am I suppose to place it in another bag without concern of something spilling? Also those gadgets that remove air when wrapping, do they help?
    – Jim
    Aug 18 at 11:15
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    Anything you do to contain moisture from the heated toast or toppings will add to the problem...sealing...wrapping....etc. So you have to weigh convenience against quality to arrive at the best solution for you.
    – moscafj
    Aug 18 at 11:22
  • So those air removals gadgets for sealing bags are not relevant for moisture?
    – Jim
    Aug 21 at 16:00
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    @Jim...highly relevant if you are looking to retain any crispness that results from toasting. They trap moisture (even small amounts) which will immediately begin to rehydrate your toast, leading the the issue that you are trying to remedy.
    – moscafj
    Aug 21 at 16:34
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What about toasting the bread twice. Toast it lightly once, let it cool on a rack, toast it the second time, well done and let it cool well before wrapping it

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  • Is the idea to completely dry it?
    – Jim
    Aug 21 at 15:22
  • Completely dry toast actually doesn’t make good sandwiches. It’s brittle and cracks apart when you bite into it, potentially making a mess. And you often have to compensate for the moisture as overly dry bread will suck moisture out of your mouth as you’re eating it. (Like eating too many crackers)
    – Joe
    Aug 23 at 13:09

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