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I made 1-liter almond milk at home, I also brought vanilla essence to put into that but I don't know how much vanilla essence I should include in 1 liter of almond milk.

Can anybody guide me on this? Thank you.

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This cannot be answered directly as 1) I don't know how strong your essence is, 2) how rich your almond milk is and 3) Only you know how strong a vanilla flavor you want.

Instead I will suggest an approach, which is to add small amounts and mix it in, tasting as you go until you get the flavor you want. Record how much you add per unit (cup/pint/liter/etc.) of almond milk so you aren't guessing next time.

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  • Hinted in the answer but not explicitly stated - you can work on a smaller sample - say 100ml, then multiply up the amount used. With some essence, if you don't want it to be strongly flavoured, that could be drops (using an eye-dropper) per 100ml, but increments of say 1/4 tsp between tastes is probably more realistic (as a guess at the "small amounts"). The advantage of working on a small sample is if you overshoot you've got some left for diluting it
    – Chris H
    Oct 22, 2021 at 10:03
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    I know what you're saying @ChrisH, and that's one way to do it. In practice 100ml isn't that much, and if it's a concentrated vanilla flavor it could be hard to get it right using the same measurements. How you you translate 5 drops full for 100ml to 2 liters? If you test with the whole amount you can add 1/8 or 1/4 of a teaspoon each time and even it it's concentrated vanilla you won't overshoot.
    – GdD
    Oct 22, 2021 at 10:23
  • I'd convert by using a dropper to fill a teaspoon, counting the drops, and applying a little arithmetic. That works because I've got everything I need for that but also because I'm so used to that sort of calculation (whether for work, DIY, or cooking) that it's an insignifcant part of the whole job - and I want to give my daughter the experience of that sort of practical maths when we cook together
    – Chris H
    Oct 22, 2021 at 10:57

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