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In this video an Australian claims to make "breakfast pasta". He uses something called "Cloud Milk", but my local grocery store doesn't have any of these.

What kind of food is Australian "breakfast pasta" and how can I make it from ingredients found in Texas?

Update

In the comments it was questioned whether this was real, you can see the chef eating the prepared Breakfast Pasta here

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    You linked a comedy video. In that video, no edible food is produced. It is part of the absurd-style humor of the video to use non-existing terms - so I can't see any real question here.
    – rumtscho
    Nov 19 at 18:08
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    On the off chance that you really didn't get the joke, "cloud milk" was a jocular way to refer to water. You should be able to find it at any grocery store or gas station in Texas, or just turn on a tap.
    – The Photon
    Nov 19 at 19:33
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    It's drinkable liquid you get out of a cloud instead of out of a cow. As far as I know there's nothing more complicated about it than that. (And you can see in the video that the "cloud milk" was clear)
    – The Photon
    Nov 19 at 19:49
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    Not a cultural dish, nothing specific to Australia (except the accent), not a chef preparing a traditional dish. Ergo not within our scope. It’s a comedian/YouTuber acting strange for the sake of the video. You could interpret the food (leftover pasta found in the fridge, water, eaten for breakfast) as the equivalent of the cliché „cold pizza from last night“ or any other random thing that has just the role of showing the obnoxiousness of the character. There is no “dish” or recipe involved, especially no „country specific traditional fare“.
    – Stephie
    Nov 19 at 20:54
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    If you have any questions about how comedy works, what props are good for, or about the finer points of the English language (whichever version), this is not the right place.
    – Stephie
    Nov 19 at 20:54