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Up until now I was more than sure that the longer I cook pasta, the more soft it becomes. And if I want to have an al dente pasta, I simply need to cook it 2-3 minutes shorter than I'd cook it to get it normal.

Until today when I saw this on a package of my pasta:

enter image description here

Is this some kind of print error or I don't understand something obvious. How cooking longer can make pasta more crispy (rather than soft)?

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    What type of pasta is it? I'm pretty certain it's just an error (are there more detailed instructions elsewhere on the packaging you could compare it with?), but maybe it's a kind of pasta that would normally be undercooked (perhaps to go in soup?) and that's why 'normale' in this context is firmer than 'al dente'.
    – dbmag9
    Commented Feb 25, 2022 at 21:21
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    Thank you. This was a typical pasta to be used with variety of dishes and thus I assumed that this is a print error. Thank you for confirming that.
    – trejder
    Commented Feb 27, 2022 at 20:43

1 Answer 1

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This is almost certainly a packaging error. It is the reverse of what your picture shows, and you are correct. Al dente (or "to the tooth") is achieved before the noodle is completely soft and thoroughly cooked all the way through. Al dente is arrived at in less time, by definition.

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  • Thank you. This was a typical pasta to be used with variety of dishes and thus I assumed that this is a print error. Thank you for confirming that.
    – trejder
    Commented Feb 27, 2022 at 20:43

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