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enter image description here

This is a very popular dish sold in Vietnamese restaurants in Poland.

  1. Is this an authentic dish? (I guess not!)
  2. What is its real name?
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  • 1
    It looks somewhat like char siu, but without knowing what it tastes like, I can only guess. I also tried googling "vietnamese red chicken" & mainly got char siu recipes from pictures looking vaguely similar. There's also cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/78931/…
    – Tetsujin
    Commented Dec 7, 2022 at 19:16
  • @Tetsujin, This is not Char Siu.
    – user366312
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 0:34

2 Answers 2

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It is not unique to Poland.

Apparently "red chicken" in Vietnam goes back a ways, both as a local variation of Chinese char siu, and (confusingly) as a pedigree of the breed of chicken used in standard Vietnamese chicken per this Egullet thread.

Per that thread and other places, it seems to be highly regional within Vietnam itself. For example, none of the many Vietnamese restaurants in my hometown have it, possibly because most of the folks here immigrated from North Vietnam. So my guess would be that a bunch of Vietnamese moved to Poland from whereever "red chicken" was popular, apparently somewhere in South Vietnam.

The Polish version, of course, is likely to have some local customization, based on ingredient availability if nothing else.

Note: I am not Vietnamese, Polish, nor have I ever eaten chicken in Vietnam. The above is all from internet searching.

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  • This is not Char Siu.
    – user366312
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 0:34
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After talking to my Vietnamese friend, I learned this is not an authentic native Vietnamese dish. This is a specific dish sold by Chinese restaurants in Vietnam, which is not widespread and popular.

The English name is simply Chinese Fried Chicken or Chinese Style fried Chicken.

The equivalent Vietnamese name is Gà Rán Trung Hoa. In Vietnam, it looks like the following:

enter image description here

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    It’s strange, but there’s actually a concept of transplanted cuisines like ‘American Chinese’ where there are dishes that are common to find in Chinese restaurants in the United States even though they don’t exist in that form in China. So you’re not just dealing with ‘Vietnamese’ food, but ‘Polish Vietnamese’ (which in this case has Chinese roots). Basically, the immigrant cuisine adapts to local tastes and ingredients, but it somehow gets spread to other restaurants (word of mouth? Chefs moving around? I have no idea how it happens)
    – Joe
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 2:07

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