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So I've just bought a new carbon steel wok under the brand Tasty and decided to season it through dry heating.

When I began, the wok was originally grey and turned a dark brown as the protective coating began to disappear as smoke. But, over time, the pan started forming small black-like rusting protrusions on the surface.

At first, I thought I was done but when I cleaned the wok and scrubbed the rust-like material off, it was blue. So, the next day I heated my pan up again to try and achieve a full blue coating of the wok but nothing really happened for at least an hour.

I don't know what to do. I had the induction stovetop at high heat the whole time so is it the pan itself or the method of seasoning?

enter image description here

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  • Does this answer your question? Should patina be burned (wok seasoning)
    – moscafj
    Jul 27, 2023 at 20:28
  • We have several seasoning and wok seasoning questions. Might you find an answer in one of those?
    – moscafj
    Jul 27, 2023 at 20:28
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    The induction element will only effectively heat the bottom of the pan, the walls, especially at the top will remain largely cold (probably cool enough to touch while cooking), so won't season properly.
    – bob1
    Jul 27, 2023 at 23:11
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    That looks to me very much like it [used to be] teflon, now burned off in large patches
    – Tetsujin
    Jul 28, 2023 at 6:35

2 Answers 2

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You appear to have tried to season a coated wok. The coating wasn't (as I suspect you thought) the layer of factory applied oil which is intended to protect the wok from rusting before you season it yourself, but a non-stick coating.

By heating the wok to high temperatures and scrubbing it you have caused the non-stick coating to peel.

If it is any consolation, amazon reviews for this wok show that many people find the non-stick coating peels after a few uses anyway. https://us.amazon.com/Tasty-Carbon-Non-Stick-Helper-Handle/dp/B07H2NWCTQ

It may be possible for you to remove the remainder of the non-stick by using steel-wool and them seasoning the wok once you have the inside down to bare metal.

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  • I'll consider your advice. Thanks for your answer and the research that went into it.
    – Evan
    Aug 2, 2023 at 4:17
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I really think that is [was] a teflon-coated pan that you've now partly burned the teflon off.

The early stages of seasoning a wok on a stove-top look like this - brown patina over steel-grey substrate.

enter image description here

Conversely, this is what a cheap non-stick [teflon or similar] wok looks like. A smooth, perfectly even colour, mid to dark grey, with sometimes a tiny hint of 'sparkle' to it if you look closely.

enter image description here

Yours very much looks like it used to be like this. Teflon cannot stand high temperatures & will be destroyed by over-heating [not to mention that the gasses it gives off whilst doing so are carcinogenic].

I think your only recourse now is to physically sand off the surface to reveal the actual steel underneath. Don't burn it off, teflon is harmless at low temperatures. Then you can season it like a raw steel wok… upside-down in the oven, not on a burner, unless you have absolutely no alternative. Regular domestic burners of any type cannot get heat to the top edges of a wok, so it becomes very difficult to season beyond about half way..


…and thanks to Spagirl's detective work, we have confirmation of this theory… non-stick wok.

enter image description here

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  • I see. So, when I plan on buying another wok in the future, should I look for the ones that aren't non-stick and have a coating since seasoning a wok essentially makes it nonstick?
    – Evan
    Aug 2, 2023 at 4:15
  • It's up to you. I used to have a plain carbon steel wok I seasoned myself, but swapped to a good non-stick about 4 years ago, which is still doing well - cookserveenjoy.com/products/masterclass-carbon-steel-355cm-wok Just don't try to season a non-stick wok… & don't buy cheap non-stick or anything that calls itself 'ceramic'.
    – Tetsujin
    Aug 2, 2023 at 6:38

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