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Two days ago, as the Belgian son of a German mother, I tried to make Grüne Klöße, a German potato dish, created from grated (?) potatoes. The potato flakes get squeezed, in order to get the water out, the resulting potato flakes become a dough, which gets formed into balls and those get cooked in a very gentle way: even experienced Klöße-cookers sometimes end up with potato soup :-)

As I'm a complete newbie, I also ended up with a mess and in future, I would like to avoid this. In supermarkets in Germany, it's possible to buy prepared Klöße, which are packed in a kind of paper bags, preventing the potato flakes from getting loose and ruining the dish.

I would like to buy such paper bags (although I believe other material, like cotton might be better suited), I could search for these on bol.com (or any other e-commerce platform) but I have no idea how those bags are called, not in English nor in Dutch (my mother tongue).

Does anybody have an idea where I might find such Klöße-bags?

Beware: at the beginning of the preparation process, the grated potato flakes must be squeezed in order to get the moisture out of it. For that I use a regular kitchen towel, so this is not what I'm talking about: I'm specifically looking for the small bags in which the individual Klöße are to be cooked.

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    The German term is „Kochbeutel“, literally translated „cooking bags”.
    – Stephie
    Feb 4 at 21:10
  • Just to confirm - the klöße are cooked in the paper bag and water gets through?
    – bob1
    Feb 4 at 21:13
  • In the US, makeshift dumpling bags made of cheesecloth maybe? Feb 5 at 3:40
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    @bob1: indeed, the water gets through.
    – Dominique
    Feb 5 at 6:11
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    @quarague Thanks. Though my German is rather limited, the only reference I see there is to tearing open a cooking bag, which doesn't provide any information about how it works. I've had Knödel at restaurants while visiting Germany, but never attempted to make them myself and am unlikely to find these sorts of packets in my country at the other end of the world.
    – bob1
    Feb 6 at 19:09

3 Answers 3

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One option might be "nut milk bags" which are designed to filter the liquid squeezed out of nuts. It's just cheesecloth sewn into a sturdy bag shape.

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  • This looks like a great idea (I also found some items on the mentioned website), but one thing's not clear to me: it's the idea to boil the Klöße in those bags. Are they foreseen to handle that high temperature?
    – Dominique
    Feb 5 at 7:21
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    @Dominique if it’s cheesecloth made of cotton, it can handle boiling; that’s a common use-case, where you wrap herbs in cheesecloth to make a sachet that you can later remove after cooking. I can’t comment on other materials. Feb 5 at 7:48
  • I don't think this is a good idea. A nut milk bag has a large volume. If you make a Kloß the size of a nut milk bag, it will never cook through.
    – rumtscho
    Feb 5 at 9:00
  • @rumtscho considering the size of a Serviettenknödel, even a whole nut milk bag might work. But the material can also be sewn into smaller pieces.
    – Stephie
    Feb 5 at 9:50
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    @Stephie I would consider "buy cheesecloth and sew your own cooking bags" to be an entirely different answer from "buy nut milk bags and use them".
    – rumtscho
    Feb 5 at 10:02
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One idea you could try is using empty cotton tea bags. These seem to be available easily (I just found a few on ebay when trying to search for 'Kochbeutel' in German). Check the size but large ones should be big enough for reasonably sized potato dumplings. They are also designed for immersing in boiling water and letting the water through.

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  • Although this is a very good idea, it won't work as a Kloß is about twice as large as a tea bag.
    – Dominique
    Feb 5 at 10:02
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    @Dominique there are different sizes of reusable tea bags, they aren't the same size as pre-packaged tea.
    – rumtscho
    Feb 5 at 10:03
  • @Dominique You need to check the size of the tea bags. There are some that are the same size as already filled tea bags and these are way too small but there are also some that are much bigger, maybe 8 times 12 cm when lying flat. Not really spherical for round dumplings but should be big enough.
    – quarague
    Feb 5 at 10:36
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I know it's not a 'cooking bag' answer, but my experience (Dutch heritage, culinary experience and training) is that most of the successful recipes for these kinds of 'dumplings' use some kind of binder, usually a starch. Ranging from the 'saved' potato starch settled out 'sediment' at the bottom of the potato water bowl, to added 'flour (either wheat flour or potato starch or even 'cream of wheat' (farina) - as many variations as there are home cooks! Hope this helps.

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