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More specifically, what is the difference between broiling and boiling?

14

It doesn't compare at all - broiling is the US term for what is called grilling in UK. The heat source is above the food.

In the US, a "grill" is used to mean a "gas powered barbeque", as the Brits would say. The heat source is below the food.

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    A "broiler" (i.e., a kitchen appliance specifically designed for applying intense heat from above) is often also called a "salamander", especially in professional kitchens. – ESultanik Apr 25 '11 at 12:52
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    Of course, a "grill" can also be charcoal powered rather than gas. – Sobachatina Apr 25 '11 at 13:16
  • I'd suggest a different term than "barbeque" in the US. Of course, we do call grills "barbeques", but there is also another noun, verb, and adjective of the same word, which usually means something quite different here. My talks with people from other countries (most notably Brits and Aussies) tend to have a hard time wrapping their head around the various US uses of the word "barbeque" as it tends to just be a word for general grilling where ever they're from. – Phoenix Apr 25 '11 at 15:42
  • @Phoenix what are you talking about? "I'd suggest a different term than "barbeque" in the US. Of course, we do call grills "barbeques", but there is also another noun, verb, and adjective of the same word, which usually means something quite different here" What is that noun verb and adjective? – barlop Apr 25 '11 at 19:47
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    @barlop: BBQ in the American South means slow-cooked in a smoker. Which is quite different than the grill meaning of BBQ (fast-cooked over a fire) – derobert Apr 25 '11 at 22:52

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