24

Are there any general rules to follow when choosing between bake and fan bake to cook something in the oven? What effect does each have and what are the advantages and disadvantages of both?

29

To clarify: forced-air (a/k/a "convection", a/k/a "fan bake") ovens rely on a fan to circulate the air in the oven. The fast-moving air substantially enhances the rate at which heat is transferred to the food. It is particularly good where you want the surface to brown, such as roasts and breads; it is not as good for more delicate items, such as custards and cakes, which can set too quickly or get dried out. For cookies, it depends on what effect you want, but many standard types do well in forced-air ovens because the fan helps ensure that the whole oven stays at a uniform temperature despite the presence of several trays. (Of course, the tray closest to the heating element will still cook faster than the one farthest away, so you will still have to swap them partway through.)

The general rule for using the fan is to set the oven temperature 25 degrees F (15 C) lower than what the recipe calls for using in a regular oven. Even then, don't go strictly by cooking time, as ovens vary; rather, be sure to check on your food regularly to see how fast it is cooking. You may need to cover your food to prevent over-browning, or perhaps adjust the oven temperature.

2

To add to the excellent answer already provided, I will just point out that the only times I have ever needed to turn the fan off on the connection oven was when baking something fragile. For example phillo dough.

1

I use my oven so often and I like baking, I use fan when I bake biscuit, but not for cake baking. When I bake pies I feel is more dry if I use the fan, so I still wonder what is the best way!!!

-1

We have a new JGB700 and we have used the convection mode for cooking everything since we bought it, with wonderful results! The oven automatically adjusts the temp to accommodate for the convection cooking difference, so we don't even think about it. Very convenient, and we haven't had anything dry out. Chocolate chip cookies, cupcakes, and a bundt cake all came out great. The french fries and pizza are amazingly good in this mode!

  • To the flaggers, I wonder what made you think that this is not an answer. The poster suggests that convection baking should always be used for everything. One may disagree that this gives good results, but it still addresses the question. – rumtscho Feb 14 at 13:00
-2

I am not a fan of convection bake, Everything I have baked turns out overdone and dried out. The last two pies I baked, the crust was way too dark. This is a brand new LG oven.

  • Did you adjust your baking time/temperature to account for the convection? – Erica Dec 19 '18 at 22:47
  • I would keep this and Mandy's answer. One seems to say that everything is better in convection, the other seems to say that nothing is good in convection. Even if they are incorrect, it is a valid opinion to have on the matter of how to choose which foods should be baked with convection. – rumtscho Dec 20 '18 at 11:50
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    @rumtscho I disagree; "X is better" / "I don't like Y" are not good answers to "when to use X or Y". There are better ways to figure out how to use kitchen equipments, as what was pointed in the accepted answer. – Luciano Dec 20 '18 at 12:56
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    @Luciano exactly, they are bad answers. It is the moderators' job to delete posts which are not an answer at all, such as people saying "my oven is broken and I can't get the convection to work" or similar. Answers, good or bad, are left alone by moderators. The community should downvote them if they give bad advice. – rumtscho Dec 20 '18 at 13:03
  • @rumtscho fair enough – Luciano Dec 20 '18 at 13:05
-3

Fan bake is better. It bakes things evenly and makes sure there is no raw spots.

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