3

How effective is steaming a turkey tenderloin the size of a brisket to make it tender and juicy?

I'm considering this because turkey has a tendency to dry out as it's cooked.

7

Steaming generally doesn't make meat juicier -- it is just as easy to dry out a piece of meat with wet heat as it is with dry heat, if not easier.

There are two things that you can do to make your turkey juicier. The first is a brine, which Elendil suggests above. The second is to make sure you aren't overcooking. I'd suggest using a probe thermometer and pulling the tenderloin when it is at around 160F and letting it coast to your target temperature of 165F.

  • I second this. Cooking involves being accurate and precise, meaning you want to be able to get food to a precise temperature but also accurately reach this temp time after time. The only way your going to do that is with proper measurement and that means a thermometer. – Brendan Jan 29 '13 at 20:27
  • The reasoning here is impeccable; I would suggest for white meat, 155 coasting to 160 F is where you want to be as a temperature target. – SAJ14SAJ Jan 29 '13 at 23:04
  • Thanks, I ended up with a ok tasting turkey tenderloin I used a small piece instead of the larger one. Miss Dash chicken spices worked well to add flavor so it wasnt bland at all not real juicy but no dryness at all. – – user24015 Jan 30 '13 at 16:54
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Brining is a better solution as it gives you juicy meat and extra flavour. Steaming would result in rather a bland taste.

Brining is essentially marinading the meat in a saltwater solution (usually with some extra flavourings like peppercorns etc) overnight. You then roast the meat as normal. Super juicy, super tasty results. There are lots of guides online.

  • Thanks, I ended up with a ok tasting turkey tenderloin I used a small piece instead of the larger one. Miss Dash chicken spices worked well to add flavor so it wasnt bland at all not real juicy but no dryness at all. – user24015 Jan 30 '13 at 16:53

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