4

If someone can help me would be good.Thanks in regard.

http://postimg.org/image/n9m581rub/

  • 5
    where are you located? Did you find this on a random tree or bush, or did you buy it at a food market? Is your question whether it's safe to eat, or do you just want to know its English name so you can find recipes that use it? – Kate Gregory Apr 12 '14 at 18:26
  • I picked it up from a tree.I just want to know its name. – hhayf Apr 12 '14 at 18:57
  • Can you put something else in the picture for scale? – Lyndon White Apr 13 '14 at 3:35
  • It is 2.5 cm tall if that helps – hhayf Apr 13 '14 at 7:33
  • This may be better asked on Gardening. – SAJ14SAJ Apr 13 '14 at 12:00
2

This might be brier you're talking about.
It's hard to tell based on only that picture... it may be a type of cherry, but when I saw the post, I instantly pictured it to be a type of brier.

enter image description here

1

Looks clearly like a cherry, but might not be an edible one. The fruit is a bit ambiguous, but the leaf is a perfect match. The stem is also very telling.

A clarification on language: The sweet black cherry sold in the market is not the only fruit called "cherry". There are many types of cherry, and while I am quite sure the picture depicts one of these, I can't promise that it is a tasty, edible cherry. It is certainly not the sweet black type. It may be a chokecherry, as mentioned in the comments; botanically, this would still be a cherry, just like a cantaloupe is still a melon. Or it may be any other of a number of edible and inedible cherries.

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    could be a chokecherry though – Kate Gregory Apr 12 '14 at 18:27
  • My thought exactly,but its too small for a cherry. – hhayf Apr 12 '14 at 18:58
  • @user24364 : we have nothing to give it scale ... you need a ruler in the picture or a coin or something else of a standard size. – Joe Apr 12 '14 at 22:36
  • It's 2.5 cm tall. – hhayf Apr 12 '14 at 23:01
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    There are many different types of cherry. I cannot promise that the picture is of one of the types which are normally eaten. A chokecherry is, botanically speaking, as much of a cherry as the ones we eat. Of course, if somebody can make a more differentiated identification than mine, it would be good. – rumtscho Apr 13 '14 at 1:15

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