16

Our Better Homes and Gardens cookbook calls for "1 package active dry yeast" in its pizza recipe, which is less than helpful, since we keep a container of bulk yeast in the freezer. What is the standard volume (e.g. in teaspoons) of yeast in a package?

17

According to Red Star, a very common yeast brand in the US:

The strip contains three packets; each packet in the strip is considered one package. Each package contains 1/4 oz. or 2 1/4 teaspoons of yeast.

This is approximately 7 grams, or 11 ml.

This is representative of all of the US brands.

  • 7
    7g a sachet is standard in the UK, so it would seem to be somewhat standard – ElendilTheTall May 4 '14 at 20:53
  • 1
    For dry yeast 1/4 oz seems to be the "standard", which is 7 g – TFD May 4 '14 at 22:09
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    Measuring by volume is unusual for dry substances in the metric system. In most countries using metric, the sachet will be labelled by grams, not milliliters. – TFD May 4 '14 at 22:09
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    @TFD: More like metric enemies, grrr... by the way, my sachets say 7g too. – Cerberus May 4 '14 at 22:28
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    7g sachets are standard in Aus too. – Dracs May 4 '14 at 23:46
0

I just made cinnamon rolls and measured it out myself: 1 Packet of Yeast = 1 1/2 Tsp

This is Red Star instant yeast that I'm using.

  • 2
    I wonder why your measurement of 1¼ t differs so much from the 2¼ t that Red Star states. – Edward Brey Dec 22 '17 at 17:34
  • Specifying measurements in tablespoons is not much help, given that these seem to differ everywhere. – user34961 Dec 23 '17 at 15:45
  • @Colin -- Tsp = teaspoons or tablespoons? – Erica Dec 23 '17 at 19:34
  • My best guess is it means tablespoons (capital T often means that) but I guess it's hard to say for sure. – Cascabel Mar 15 '18 at 17:00
-1

As far as measuring yeast, I use instant yeast, rather than packets. I have a Tupperware tub of year that's been in my freezer for about 15 years! It shouldn't be viable, but it is. The equivalent of 1 packet of yeast is 2 1/4 tsp. Since my yeast is so old, I use 1 1/2 tbsp (sometimes more) and I get wonderful bread out of my almost 25-year-old bread machine. I hope this helps.

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