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I'm conscious of this other question, yet this is (veritably) a different question that doesn't duplicate.

What are some tools or appliances that peel an entire garlic bulb?
Are there any for crushing it? Are there any that accomplishes both?

I've also tried the shaking method with metalware, but this fails for me.

Google returned the following that requires processing one clove at a time. I'm interested in something more efficient and productive:
http://www.amazon.com/Zak-Designs-E-Z-Rol-Garlic-Peeler/dp/B00004RDDP
http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-1059DB-Garlic-Peeler/dp/B000HJW8MW/ref=pd_sbs_k_8?ie=UTF8&refRID=0VAMW3C7M17D0MDN1RTG

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I built a little wooden impeller for my food processor that hits the cloves hard enough to peel them, but not hard enough to gouge or break them: garlic impellor The center piece is an old dough mixer blade for the food processor. The wood is maple; pine is too weak. The rubber flaps on the bottom, screwed on, keep the cloves moving so they'll collide with the wood. I've peeled as few as 2 cloves, and as many as 4 bulbs with the device. Peeling takes about 30 seconds. It works best if you separate the cloves from the bulb before starting. I just cut the bulb end off and pull apart.

If I want small bits of garlic afterwards, I just use the food processor's cutting blade. Otherwise a rolling pin should do a good job of crushing en masse.

  • +1 DIY! You removed the metal bits from the dough blade first, correct (and how)? I've never tried hacking my food processor like this, but I think you have inspired me to start... – hoc_age Jul 11 '14 at 13:29
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    This was an old pastry blade, all plastic. I just cut the blades off with my mototool. Metal blades'd fall to a hacksaw or maybe just a vicegrip. I'd been using the shake in a pot method for a few years, but find this much more reliable and convenient, especially when I need a ton for pesto etc. – Wayfaring Stranger Jul 11 '14 at 13:59
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For my time, though I like the concept of peeling a bunch of cloves all at once, but I don't like the cleanup of an extra gadget. I recently learned a method, essentially as described at thekitchn, for firmly yet gently smashing the clove with the side of a chef-knife; the peel then comes off effortlessly. It works faster and easier than the rubberized roller gadgets like you linked.

Though it's not a tool/appliance like you requested, you can go through an entire head of peeling and crushing in (literally) seconds, so I argue this can be efficient and productive. My garlic-peeling life will never be the same!

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