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I'm trying to get more raw veggies in my diet in general and Kale is such a good one. I recently had a raw kale side dish at a Korean restaurant that may or may not have been fermented. It's flavor was very subtle and lightly sweet.

I'm trying to find how to make this, though I'm imagining the restaurant may have simply innovated something on the fly (likely not a traditional recipe). I don't care to copy it exactly either - just looking for something similar to it on any level.

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  • I've put this on hold since you seem to be pretty clearly asking for recipes involving raw kale. If you mean to be asking what that Korean thing was and can describe it, that's a reasonable question. And if you're trying to ask how to deal with a specific problem with preparing it raw (it's too tough, maybe?), that's a good question too. So feel free to edit and we'll be happy to reopen
    – Cascabel
    Dec 6, 2014 at 21:23
  • Got it - I'll re-word the question. Thanks for the pointing all that out :)
    – jhawes
    Dec 7, 2014 at 18:21
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    Thanks! If you can remember any more details about the dish it might help people answer more confidently, but I'll go ahead and reopen now.
    – Cascabel
    Dec 7, 2014 at 20:45

1 Answer 1

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Not sure if this is what you are looking for, but thought I'd post that in researching, I found that Korean side dishes are called banchan, and the specific dish that you are speaking of might be kale namul:

Kale namul 케일나물 (Korean Seasoned Kale)

Makes 2 cups

1 pound kale
1 green onion
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 tsp. soy sauce
1 tsp. roasted sesame oil
½ tsp. roasted sesame seeds
salt, to taste

http://www.apricosa.com/2011/03/different-sort-of-namul.html

The sweetness you refer to might just come from the kale itself, depending on the varietal.

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  • Looks good - I'll give this a try
    – jhawes
    Jan 2, 2015 at 19:31

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