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I have a recipe for a dutch apple pancake (basically sauté apples, make batter and place in pan, add apples, bake) that I wanted to try with peaches. However, my sister thinks it'll turn out too wet/soggy with the peaches. My thought is to use less ripe peaches or sauté them for less time. Will that work? How can I replace the apples with peaches?

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I just skip the sautéing for peaches entirely. The primary benefit of sautéing the apples is to make sure that they are tender by the time baking completes, which isn't necessary for a fruit that's already soft.

  • I would have said the point in sauteing the apple's is more for the caramelized sugars (Which is added flavor), than to ensure it was cooked. – Doug Dec 25 '14 at 20:46
  • I agree @Doug I'd definitely caramelize the peaches. That will also make them less wet. – Jolenealaska Dec 25 '14 at 22:32
  • Baked apples caramelize as well, but a dutch baby doesn't bake long enough in my experience, and the contact with the moist batter may reduce the maximum heat they'll reach. In my experience very ripe peaches (probably not available this time of the year in N. Hemisphere) will not lose much moisture in a saute, but they will become softer; this isn't a desirable trait because then you'll lose all the texture of the peach, and if you wanted to do that you could just buy them canned. – JasonTrue Dec 25 '14 at 22:38
  • Slightly underripe peaches may caramelize without destroying the texture. However, I tend to prefer roasting or grilling if I want to caramelize peaches. – JasonTrue Dec 25 '14 at 22:39
  • Yeah, I'd say keep them fresh and if you want a caramelize taste, then you should caramelize a sauce separately from the peaches. Underripe peaches won't be nearly as sweet or appetizing even after cooking, and ripe peaches will just turn to mush. – tsturzl Jan 6 '15 at 1:20
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I see no reason why there would be much difference between doing the pancakes with peaches or apples. If you have a quick Google for Dutch Peach Pancake, you will be bombarded with different recipes. As there are so many out there I won't bother sticking one in here.

All I will say is rather than not saute the peaches, as suggested in the other answer. I would advise, the longer you saute them the more water that will be evaporated.

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