3

I accidentally doubled the amount of lemon juice in my Hollandaise recipe. The result is much too sour to be usable, but if not for that, the sauce would be okay.

Could I rescue this sauce by immediately preparing another batch with no lemon juice and then whipping or folding the two batches together?

I would have to melt another stick of butter and separate four eggs, so assume it takes me 15 minutes from when the first batch is done to finish preparing the second batch.

  • 1
    I would have answered this experimentally right away but my 18 month-old son was feeding jam to the wall. – Air Jan 3 '15 at 16:41
3

Yes, do it. Making the second batch is your best way to get something good.

First, keep your first batch warm, don't let it cool down. Second, you don't have to wait them to get ready to mix them. Start with the new yolk with a bit of water, beat until foamy. Then, instead of drizzling oil, drizzle the old batch, until incorporated. Then add more butter. Use a lower temperature than for the normal beating process, so you don't overcook the yolk from the existing batch.

Alternatively, if you don't mind having a fattier sauce, just add more butter to the existing batch. The fat absorbability of hollandaise is not limited by the yolk emulsifiers, but by the available water. A single yolk can absorb liters of fat, if you started with a bit of liquid before adding the butter.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.