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I don't have access to baking parchment and I need to make a cheesecake tomorrow. Is there any substitute that I can use for baking parchment?

7

Go the old-fashioned route and simply butter your pan.
Worked for our grandmothers, still works today ;-)

  • 1
    Agreed ... my mom never used parchment when baking a cheesecake. The important thing was a springform pan, and to make sure that the base was set so the flat side was up (so that you could slip a nice in tight across the surface). – Joe Feb 17 '15 at 13:59
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Even cheaper is using regular ole white computer printer paper sprayed with oil spray or baking spray. Toss it without feeling wasteful. I have used it up to 450 degrees. Will brown slightly, but has never burned. Try it yourself first with nothing on it so that you will be confident to use it with your breads.

  • I would be wary of using some of the newer "environmentally friendly" copy paper. Having seen the mess these make of the innards of photocopiers and laster printers by shedding fibres, I wouldn't want to eat off it. There is also the possibility of chemical contamination due to the bleaching process. Maybe OK once in a while if you are in a jam, but I wouldn't recommend using a non-food grade product such a way regularly. – Greybeard Sep 2 '19 at 16:24
0

Ungreased copy paper works well for regular meringue cookies, but I can't say if it would work for a cheesecake

Silicone, parchment paper, or baking sheets greased with butter seem to be your best bets, unfortunately.

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