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I've found that pre-soaking my beef in brine helps to break down the fibres, making the subsequent roast tender.

I've found a recipe for slow-roasting beef with Marsala. I'm wondering if I can combine the two, or if that will be a terrible idea.

My question is: Will it wreck the dish if I pre-soak beef in brine, and then slow roast with marsala?

Clarifications:

  1. This will be roasted in a ceramic dish, with a glass lid for eight hours.

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  1. By 'wreck' I mean the saltiness of the brine is pleasant during eating, as is the sweetness of the Marsala. My concern is that the two tastes (salty and sweet) will clash, making the dish inedible.

closed as primarily opinion-based by rumtscho Mar 26 '15 at 18:46

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Two clarification questions: 1) What kind of dish are you using? And 2) Why are you worried about ruining the dish? Because of the salt content? – Duncan Mar 21 '15 at 5:15
  • Sorry, but this question is simply subjective. It depends on your personal taste if you'll like the combination; I know several people (myself included) who'll hate it and also several who'll love it. The only way to know if it will work for you is to try it and see. – rumtscho Mar 26 '15 at 18:46
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Do it! Marsala is sweet, brine is salty. You may be on to something here...

Really though, I always brine anything I roast or sous-vide. No issues here.

EDIT: I would recommend using olive oil instead of butter if you are still worried. Not to mention Marsala + olive is delicious.

  • 1
    Thanks - it was awesome. It had an overall salty taste - with a slight sweet crispness to it. – hawkeye Mar 27 '15 at 9:40

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