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Before the first time I use a none-stick teflon pan, how should I do seasoning?

1- Should I first rub oil on it then heat it? [ref1] or first I should heat it then remove heat and rub oil on it? [ref2],[ref3]

2- How long should I heat it for 30 seconds (ref3)? an hour (ref4)!!! or 2-3 minutes (ref5)?

3- How much hot should oil be? Smoking point or light flame?

4- After seasoning what to do? should I wash the oil off? or leave it on the pan for a while?

5- Should I use cooking oil or frying oil (I think they write cooking oil but they mean frying oil)?

6- After each time using pan, should I wash it immediately or letting oil solidify on pan then after I ate my food I wash it?

7- To extend life span, should I rub some oil on pan after each time washing?

I appologize for links. Since I do not have 10 reputation, I cannot have more than 2 links.

ref1: www.thekitchn.com/surprising-tip-do-you-season-your-nonstick-pans-187938

ref2: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasoning_%28cookware%29

ref3: www.ehow.com/how_7745528_season-non-stick-cookware.html

ref4: cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/34420/wok-patina-comes-off/41164

ref5: www.productknowledge.com/more-myths-nonstick-coatings-myth-13.html

marked as duplicate by Cindy, rumtscho Aug 30 '15 at 19:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 7 questions have been asked. One question linked. Stupids have flooded SE. The linked answer does not give any reason why should I neglect those 5 referred link. – ardevan Aug 31 '15 at 15:29
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Absolutely not

A non-stick pans surface will be ruined when any oil becomes polymerised onto it. The whole idea of a non-stick pan is that it's surface is non-stick to food. Permanently layering it with anything else will make it less non-stick

Only use non-stick pans for low to medium heat cooking, and use no, or very little oil in them. Be very gentle with the surface so as not to scratch it, as the scratches eventually make it sticky again

Most manufacturers of non-stick pans recommend gentle hand washing with soap from new, and then removal of excess oil from the pan with a plain paper towel while still warm. Never hard washing or scrubbing

If oil does become polymerised onto the surface, sometimes you can recover them by using 3M style green polyester scourers with liquid soap to gently remove the hardened oil, if done carefully it will not overly scratch the non-stick coating

Seasoning is for plain metal pans, not for coated, glass, or ceramic

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