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I'm following this recipe.

When they say "brown it," are they saying to just brown the edges....or all the way through? Assuming I just sorta brown the outside (but it's not cooked all the way though), is this safe?

Like the inside of my stew meat won't be cooked, is simmering it for 2 hours or so enough to cook it all the way through? I'm concerned about E. coli and all that nasty stuff.

Thanks!

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    Worth noting it is the surface of meat that can become contaminated with E. coli, not the interior of whole muscles. Ground beef is another matter of course. – Glenn Stevens Sep 22 '15 at 2:44
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The idea is to brown the outside of the meat in order to develop the flavour via the Maillard Reaction. This flavour will add to the richness and meatiness of the stew as a whole. Go ahead and give it a good crust. Don't overcrowd the pan or you will just end up steaming the meat in its own juices and it will never brown up: fry it in small batches instead.

Two hours braising in the stewing liquid will easily be enough to cook one-inch cubes of beef all the way through and will easily see off most nasty stuff.

  • How long per side typically? or just until it's a nice brown on at least most of the sides? – Mercfh Sep 21 '15 at 16:17
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    Take your time, it's a stew not a stir fry. The better the crust, the better the flavour. Obviously don't cremate it. Here's a pretty good example: dizzypigbbq.com/images/RecipeImages/Stroganoff/3BrownedBeef.jpg – ElendilTheTall Sep 21 '15 at 19:11
  • for home cooking; a cast iron skillet is typically the best way to maximize the browning. Heat the pan up red hot and add beef; most home stoves do not have the BTU's necessary to do this in normal pans. Should be quick; 1-2 mins at most. – zerobane Sep 22 '15 at 18:03

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