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I would like to serve a hot garlic mayonnaise (not spicy) ? Is it possible to do that and how ?

Edit : I do not want to make a Hollandaise sauce but a real hot mayonnaise. I had seen that served on the top of a steam fish filet.

  • .... Just because it was on top of a hot fish filet doesn't mean the mayo was hot. Where did you "see" this? – Catija Oct 22 '15 at 16:16
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    which begs the question -- is hot mayonnaise still mayonnaise, or is it now something else? I'm pretty sure the definition of mayonnaise, like hollandaise, is fairly strictly defined in the official terms of French cuisine. (which is not to say that it isn't a valid sauce to use. just wondering about what it should be called.) – NadjaCS Oct 22 '15 at 18:52
  • See my answer it is still a mayonnaise (see ingredients) but hot – coincoin Oct 22 '15 at 19:01
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    I think you may be a little confused about what you're asking and the answers you are getting. NadjaCS and @Elendil are pointing out that all of these sauces have strict definitions. One of the original sources of mayo as an emulsified sauce explicitly says that it is cold. Therefore, you are not asking for mayo. You are asking for something mayo-like that is hot. If it is hotter than 150F the yolks are definitely cooked and what you get is closer to Hollandaise, as Elendil said. You can find many faster and more foolproof methods for emulsified sauces if you aren't hung up on the word "mayo". – Sobachatina Oct 22 '15 at 22:45
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You are basically talking about a Hollandaise sauce, which is similar to mayonnaise in that it is an emulsion of egg yolk and fat. The main difference is that in mayonnaise the fat is oil, whereas in Hollandaise it is butter. The main flavours in mayonnaise come from an acid (lemon juice or vinegar) and mustard - Hollandaise likewise uses lemon juice, and mustard can be easily added.

Recipes abound for Hollandaise, so you will have no problem finding one on Google.

  • Thank you but Hollandaise has egg yok cooked. Mayonnaise it's based on raw egg yok. I want to serve real hot mayonnaise (with garlic and safron). – coincoin Oct 22 '15 at 16:04
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    OK. When you work out how to make egg yolk hot without cooking it, I'm all ears. – ElendilTheTall Oct 22 '15 at 16:20
  • I posted an answer – coincoin Oct 22 '15 at 17:15
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Make mayo the usual way, and then heat it up. Mayonnaise is an ingredient in many cooked dishes - it makes a wonderful, flavorful substitute for butter on grilled cheese sandwiches and for oil and eggs in cake mixes, and there's a recipe on the back of my store-bought mayo jar (Gasp! Heresy!) for a chicken dish where you coat chicken breasts in mayo and breadcrumbs and bake them at 425º.

The texture and flavor of the condiment may change to lesser or greater extents during cooking, depending on temperature and the time it's held there: experiment a bit to see what works best for your dish.

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So I got the recipe which is done by a master chef from The culinary academy of cuisine.

  • Do a standard mayonnaise with raw egg yolk :
    • Add a teaspoon of mustard and beat with the whip
    • Add a mix of olive oil (50%) and soya oil (50%) so you have a basic mayonnaise
  • Crush a garlic add it to your mayonnaise with a dash of saffron (now you have a garlic/saffron mayonnaise)
  • Reserve at room temperature
  • In a pan, put two spoons of water. Put the heat on the pan. When arriving before boiling, reduce the gas and add the mayonnaise slowly in the pan with the water while beating it.
  • If you get the perfect temperature, emulsion will come. If it's too cold or too hot, the mayonnaise will break in through. Eggs and oil will separate.

So mastering the temperature is very important. Unfortunately, this kind of sauce has to be done every time you serve a fish. But it's very unusual sauce but when you succeed and you master it, you're a good cook.

I also found a recipe from a chef of El Bulli here but there he uses a siphon which is a different approach and easier.

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    It sure sounds like the eggs are going to end up cooked... – Cascabel Oct 23 '15 at 3:45
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    The whole heating process of that recipe seems completely unnecessary. You're starting with a basic aïoli that's already emulsified, then heating it with water, which risks breaking it, and then cooking that water out anyway. Why not just make it easy on yourself and spoon the room temp mayonnaise over the hot dish, or throwing it under a salamander for a second? – SourDoh Oct 23 '15 at 4:01

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