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I am making a fudge recipe that calls for 1cup whole milk and 5 cups sugar. It also uses 2 sticks of butter and 25 marshmallows. I'm wondering if I can omit the milk and cut back on the sugar by using sweetened condensed milk.

  • Condensed milk has a lot of water removed. How are you planning to incorporate that back in? – Batman Dec 7 '15 at 16:33
  • Hello JennyJ71, and welcome! Our site suggests related questions in the sidebar when you ask a new one, and the top question is quite relevant in this case: cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/18443. Basically, sugar is the main ingredient in fudge, so while the substitution itself might be possible (the answers should clear up that), I doubt that you can reduce the sugar. – rumtscho Dec 7 '15 at 17:31
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There are recipes that specifically use condensed and or evaporated milk as a shortcut to making fudge. It's not just a drop in replacement, it's a whole change in method. Just do a search for "easy fudge recipe" on Google to get examples of these fudge recipes that use condensed milk.

To add my opinion however, the old fashioned cooking and churning method produces the best fudge, but the condensed milk method although isn't as good at least produces a more consistent result. I do the old fashioned method. It's worth the extra effort and the extra learning curve (to recognize when the fudge is about to setup).

  • Thanks everyone! I typically use the fast and easy method found on the sweetened condensed milk label. But I found a Jack Daniels fudge recipe on Facebook that I'm about to try my hand at. Seems like the substitution process just adds work instead of reducing it, so I'm going to follow the recipe and keep my fingers crossed! I appreciate all the comments! They certainly helped. – JennyJ71 Dec 7 '15 at 18:42
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    Just so you know, the it's not a reduction process. It a candy making process. The sugar in condensed milk is already candied somewhat, where as traditional fudge you need to candy it yourself. – Escoce Dec 8 '15 at 0:52

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