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Weekend mornings is always a breakfast feast in our house. When it comes to the bacon it's a war zone in the kitchen with hot fat drops shooting everywhere, and sometimes I get hit.

The texture of the bacon is never the same from soft to crispy, probably because I play with the heat so much that its never consistent. I am only doing that because I am trying to eliminate the hot fat drops.

I use a cast iron grill pan to cook the bacon on medium heat (most of the time) on a gas stove. I do preheat the pan, and use about 3 teaspoons of olive oil per 300g of bacon.

I presume I am missing a trick here or my heat is wrong. SO: What is the best temperature and method too cook bacon in a grill pan?

Please help me bring back the peace to my kitchen. :)

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    A grill pan seems like a bad place to start for bacon. You'll usually end up with less-cooked bits where the fat is chewy, and there is nothing to contain the splatter. A regular pan will contain the splatter better and cook more evenly, but my preferred method is in the microwave on a plate with an inverted plate covering it. This contains all the splatter and cooks the bacon much more evenly. Also, I can't think why you would need oil to cook bacon on ANY surface. It's got plenty of fat by itself. – James Dec 11 '15 at 14:15
  • Agreed w/ James ... if your problem is uneven cooking, stop using a grill pan. Either bake, microwave, or cook on a flat surface. – Joe Dec 11 '15 at 14:40
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    @James That sounds like an answer to me... – logophobe Dec 11 '15 at 14:44
  • @logophobe I don't consider it an answer because the question asks very specifically about the best method to use for a grill pan, but I'll add it anyway – James Dec 11 '15 at 17:44
  • @James That's perfectly acceptable for answers as long as you can back up the reason you're suggesting alternatives. If someone is using the wrong tool for the job, it's perfectly valid to suggest a different method. See here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/8891/… – logophobe Dec 11 '15 at 17:54
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Cast iron is great for bacon, but not a grill pan. The bacon really needs to be floating on its own grease for nice even heating.

The best bacon is cooked slowly. Preheat the pan so it is an evenly heated cooking surface, then slide you bacon on to the hot pan. By slide, I mean move it around on the pan before you drop it so the pan gets a coat of grease before dropping the bacon and getting it stuck on the hot pan.

Let it cook at medium low heat, it will take longer but you'll get less splatter, the bacon won't burn, and it won't dry out either, you also have a larger window of opportunity to pick up the bacon while it's "just right" whatever that is for you.

  • I like starting bacon in a cold pan. Even if I take my time arranging the slices in the pan, they still all get done at the same time. And I've never had bacon stick to the pan when it starts out cold. – mrog Dec 23 '15 at 20:26
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I use two methods for bacon, depending on how much I am trying to make:

  1. For small batches, I use a cast iron pan. I place the bacon on the pan cold, and cook over medium heat, turning and swapping strips around as necessary to cook evenly. I find it easier to control sticking with the cold pan over a preheated one. I do not add oil because there is so much fat in the bacon already.

  2. For large batches, I prefer the oven where you can cook more at once. I place the bacon in a single layer on a large pan(s), and cook at 300F for approximately 30 minutes.

I find people can be very particular in their bacon preferences for fatty, crispy, and degrees in between. This may change your cooking time substantially.

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    +1 for #2, low and slow in the oven is the way to go. – Dan C Dec 11 '15 at 17:23
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    For the oven method, I like either a broiler pan or a wire rack on a sheet pan, so the fat drips away. (which I save for other cooking ... but it means that I don't have to deal with as much blotting to get the fat off the bacon) – Joe Dec 11 '15 at 17:57
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I know that you are specifically asking about using a grill pan, but a grill pan seems like a bad place to start for bacon. You'll usually end up with less-cooked bits where the fat is chewy, and there is nothing to contain the splatter.

A regular pan will contain the splatter better and cook more evenly, but my preferred method is in the microwave on a plate with an inverted plate covering it. This contains all the splatter and cooks the bacon much more evenly. Also, I can't think why you would need oil to cook bacon on ANY surface. It's got plenty of fat by itself.

  • There exist grill pans w/ sides on them, but I'm not a fan ... haven't really found anything it's better at than other pans. (closest case is starting sausages in a little bit of water, so they cook through and then can get some grill marks on 'em ... but I don't care that much about grill marks) – Joe Dec 11 '15 at 17:54
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    Agreed, but there is flavor in the grill marks. It's not just appearance. When I make Italian sausage I start it in the cast iron pan to get a good sear on either side, then I dump it into the sauce and let it finish in the sauce at a simmer for another 35 minutes. – Escoce Dec 13 '15 at 23:03

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