1

I use one table spoon of Tata Tea Gold leaves per 125 ml of milk + 25 ml of water.

I boil the mixture of milk and water first. Turn the gas off, put the tea in and stir it, and then I place a lid on the vessel for 6 minutes.

After 6 minutes I stir again, and drink.

Now if I turn to all full leaves black tea, how many leaves will I require with the method above to achieve the same effect?

4
  • It says "loose leaves" not "whole leaves" - are you sure you will get "countable" leaves?
    – Stephie
    Dec 25, 2015 at 8:18
  • @Stephie I thought they mean same! What does loose leaves mean? Dec 25, 2015 at 8:19
  • @Stephie have changed the link. Dec 25, 2015 at 8:24
  • Do you really mean to be asking about how many leaves (as in counting the leaves) rather than just a volume?
    – Cascabel
    Dec 25, 2015 at 23:43

1 Answer 1

4

Loose leaves will be "coarser" than "broken" teas and usually look "rolled up" or "curled".

I'd start with a bit more (e.g. a heaping teaspoon loose leaf vs. a scant level teaspoon of broken) and see how it turns out. Many sources sugest meassuring tea by weight, thus eliminating the variance due to different "packing" of coarser or finer tea.

The reason why I suggest experimenting is that broken tea vs. whole leaves will have a different flavour profile (even for "the same" tea) due to the loss of aromatic oils and higher extraction of tannins in broken tea.

Wikipedia has an extensive list of tea grades and leaf sizes.

And this website gives volumetric equivalents for the same weight - One heaping tablespoon loose leaf tea as roughly one teaspoon broken tea and a scant teaspoon gunpowder (tightly rolled balls).

4
  • what does whole leaf look like then? Dec 25, 2015 at 8:34
  • Whole leaves will be these little "rolls", I had just assumed you wanted to count them - which is pretty uncommon. Perhaps I misread your question.
    – Stephie
    Dec 25, 2015 at 8:36
  • You said: It says "loose leaves" not "whole leaves" - are you sure you will get "countable" leaves? and then Loose leaves will be "coarser" than "broken" teas and usually look "rolled up" or "curled". That's why I am asking the difference between loose and whole leaves. Dec 25, 2015 at 8:40
  • Typical naming mixup - the "standard term is "loose leaves", "whole leaves" is rarely used. They are the same.
    – Stephie
    Dec 25, 2015 at 8:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.