2

I have heard it is from an ancient ocean floor's deposits that have since been uplifted by the Himalayan orogeny, but what in that ocean water made the salt pink. I've been to the Bonneville Salt Flats and the salt there is a normal white color.

Other questions, for example Pink salt vs regular salt just concern the taste in dishes. I am concerned with the actual difference in chemical composition.

  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Pink salt vs regular salt – ElmerCat Dec 25 '15 at 17:51
  • 3
    The Wikipedia article about Himalayan salt explains why it's pink... it's due to iron content. – Catija Dec 25 '15 at 18:17
  • Hm. Unlike other sites we don't have "lacks own effort" as closing reason - but this question would be a prime example. – Stephie Dec 25 '15 at 19:17
  • 1
    @Stephie I believe "lacks effort" is a down vote reason, not a close reason. – Catija Dec 25 '15 at 20:12
  • @Catija I VTC as duplicate, just stating other sites' rules. Like: why should you have to paraphrase Wikipedia when OP couldn't be bothered to do it himself. (And yes I did +1 you.) – Stephie Dec 25 '15 at 20:44
8

As stated in the Wikipedia article about the salt, the pink color that sometimes occurs is due to iron oxide:

Himalayan salt is predominantly sodium chloride (95-98%), contaminated with 2–3% polyhalite and small amounts of ten other minerals. The pink color is due to the presence of iron oxide.

As a source, the article references this page on HowStuffWorks.com. It gives a slightly broader list of chemicals that cause the color differences:

Some pink salts, such as the salt harvested in the Himalayas, get their color from calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper and iron, Others contain carotene from salt-tolerant algae and are more peach-colored.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.