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I have some concentrated chicken broth powder in a jar but no instructions that explains how it should be mixed with water.

What is the standard chicken broth powder to water mixture?

I know that the concentrations may differ depending on the product, but assuming this product is on par with the average?

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    I think they all can very. I would try a teaspoon with a cup of water. Taste it and go from there. – NKY Homesteading Feb 17 '16 at 21:43
  • I think that's a good starting point. – Escoce Feb 17 '16 at 22:03
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While I totally agree with the other answer that this is depending on what you like, I have googled and found directions from two different well-known brands. Knorr and Maggi actually have very similar instructions.

Knorr says one slightly rounded teaspoon for one cup (250ml) of water. Maggi states 1 tsp (5g) for 1 cup (250ml) of water.

So I'd suggest to try it with 1 tsp for 1 cup and see if it needs adjustments.

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The amount is totally subjective. In general, I prefer lighter amounts in soups and heavier amounts in any flavorings (I.e collard greens or broth powder used as spice.) Cooking is really more art than science, so precision is not usually my top priority. For whatever you are cooking, and if it is safe to do so, add a small amount, stir and taste. Chicken broth powder usually has a high sodium content, so treat it as flavored salt. If more "saltiness" is desired, add a teaspoon, stir, taste, and repeat.

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