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So guys I want to make a dish called Crispy Chicken Burger patties and in the recipe it is prescribed to coat the chicken in plain flour to make it crispy so I wanted to ask if I can use Maida atta as a substitute. Thanks in advance.

  • What's the rest of the recipe? Are the patties going in to a deep fryer? – derobert Mar 25 '16 at 16:05
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You don't note which one you would want to use. Maida and atta are both made from wheat. Maida is made only from the endosperm (the large, starchy part of the wheat kernel), while atta is made from the whole grain, including the bran. Both are super-refined, though, so you might want to add a couple of tablespoons of finely crushed dried bread crumbs to the flour to give it some grain (texture); that way, it won't be as prone to soaking up your cooking oil and turning the patties soggy.

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    There's also a trick in frying, where you intentionally add some drops of liquid to your flour ... this will cause some clumps and give you a more uneven coating of flour. (leading to more surface area, and some extra crispy bits in the coating) – Joe May 25 '16 at 22:30
  • Refined usually means removing the bran and the germ. Atta is whole wheat flour, i.e., it has the bran and the germ in addition to the endosperm. What does "super-refined" mean in this context? – verbose Feb 18 '17 at 8:38
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Using atta(Whole wheat flour) instead of maida(AP flour) will impart two changes in the recipe:

  1. Color: using atta will give you slightly darker color than using maida.
  2. Flavor: using maida will give you cleaner flavor where chicken flavor and/or spices will dominate, while using atta will give you slightly earthy, wheaty flavor.

But these are usually minor things and I would use them interchangeably in your recipe without much hesitation.

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