4

In particular, this VARDAGEN Glass Bowl.

It's almost a quarter inch thick, feels heavy and solid, wonder if anyone has tried. Nothing fancy, just boil and soup kind of thing. I figure it's healthier than stainless steel. Thought?

  • 1
    The page you link to says 'WARNING - Serious or fatal crashing injuries can occur from furniture tip-over. To prevent this furniture must be permanently fixed to the wall.'. Is your stove close enough to a wall :-) – Jeff Jun 26 '16 at 9:29
  • Must be one of those tub-ready toaster ... – Whoever Jun 28 '16 at 11:56
21

No, you can't.

You should always assume glass is not safe to use on the stovetop. Essentially none of it is, and while there are a very few exceptions, they'll say so explicitly. (For example this set says stovetop-safe in the description.)

That bowl is nothing special, definitely not stovetop-safe - it'd shatter under the thermal stress. If you look carefully on the packaging, you might even find a warning that's not for use on the stovetop.

  • Thanks, you made it crystal clear. I know the Vision, just not a big fan of the color. The only other one explicit for cooking costs $200. Since it's made by MoMA, I wasn't sure if it meant to be artwork or cookware. – Whoever Jun 26 '16 at 2:23
  • In general, if it doesn't specifically say "stovetop safe", "oven safe", or "broiler safe", it's not safe to use it as anything other than a bowl. – Joe McMahon Jun 26 '16 at 4:23
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    MoMA Art installation: "A Chef who didn't bother reading the labels: The Consequences" – DVK Jun 26 '16 at 13:55
  • Visions is not glass, from what I recall when they were first marketing it (I have some.) Visions is "transparent ceramic." – Ecnerwal Jun 26 '16 at 14:18
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    @Whoever aluminum is definitely safe for cooking – Agos Jul 12 '16 at 12:25

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