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I recently noticed that a bottle of Heinz white vinegar that I purchased a while back has no nutrition facts label on it despite the fact that it's intended to be used with food. Is there a reason why the label wasn't required?

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    The nutrition label is online - Distilled White Vinegar – user3169 Aug 13 '16 at 3:51
  • Do you have a picture of the front and back of your bottle? I also found that extremely tiny label that @user3169 did on the Heinz website, but a Google image search didn't show it on every bottle, so I'm wondering if it's only on some. The answer from Ecnerwal is also interesting, and could be the reason. I'm not doubting you or anything, I just think it would be interesting to see your specific bottle. – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Aug 13 '16 at 20:12
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    There's a contact us link on the vinegar products page at the Heinz website. If you're curious enough, it would be worth sending them a note asking why some of the bottles don't have the label. A lot of people are using white vinegar for household use, and Heinz is even selling a White Cleaning Vinegar, so maybe they're getting away from the nutrition aspect. If you find out, would you edit that into your question? Thanks! – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Aug 13 '16 at 20:29
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    Its probably not critical whether its on the bottle or not -there's no nutrition in it, any more than there is in water. Might need to carry an ingredient list, or description of contents, but that's all. – bamboo Aug 13 '16 at 21:24
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It may depend on the size of the label on the bottle - there are exceptions for small label area. Looking at a gallon bottle (different brand) that has the label, the numbers are all 0 anyway, which offers another option. If you happened to purchase it from a restaurant supply, that offers yet another exception.

(j) The following foods are exempt from this section or are subject to special labeling requirements:

(4) Foods that contain insignificant amounts of all of the nutrients and food components required to be included in the declaration of nutrition information under paragraph (c) of this section, Provided, That the food bears no nutrition claims or other nutrition information in any context on the label or in labeling or advertising. Claims or other nutrition information subject the food to the provisions of this section. An insignificant amount of a nutrient or food component shall be that amount that allows a declaration of zero in nutrition labeling, except that for total carbohydrate, dietary fiber, and protein, it shall be an amount that allows a declaration of “less than 1 gram.” Examples of foods that are exempt under this paragraph include coffee beans (whole or ground), tea leaves, plain unsweetened instant coffee and tea, condiment-type dehydrated vegetables, flavor extracts, and food colors.

(13)(i) Foods in small packages that have a total surface area available to bear labeling of less than 12 square inches, Provided, That the labels for these foods bear no nutrition claims or other nutrition information in any context on the label or in labeling or advertising. Claims or other nutrition information subject the food to the provisions of this section. Foods in packages subject to requirements of paragraphs (j)(13)(ii)(A)(1) and (2) of this section do not require the information in paragraphs (d)(9) and (f)(5) related to the footnote, however the abbreviated footnote statement “% DV = % Daily Value” may be used.

Legalese from : http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/retrieveECFR?gp=1&SID=4bf49f997b04dcacdfbd637db9aa5839&ty=HTML&h=L&mc=true&n=pt21.2.101&r=PART#se21.2.101_19

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    However Heinz Apple Cider vinegar does have a Nutrition Facts label on the jar (still all 0% though). – user3169 Aug 13 '16 at 3:53
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    I wonder if that's because cider vinegar is often linked to health claims. – Joshua Engel Dec 8 '16 at 16:31

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