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I have a 6 inch and a 10 inch skillet that I can't keep from burning foods. High heat low heat. NOTHING. I am trying to use the 6 inch pan for eggs, and they stick. Using butter or Chefs Secret spray... HELP

marked as duplicate by rumtscho Aug 18 '16 at 11:52

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  • It seems that you are concerned specifically with eggs, and not just food. This is a duplicate, we already have an older question on that. There is also cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5815 which is more general about different types of food in stainless steel. – rumtscho Aug 18 '16 at 11:54
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Stainless is about the last thing I'd choose for a skillet, and if it's thin-bottomed (no sandwich/heat spreader construction) I suspect it will never work all that well. But I have no idea how yours are actually constructed as you've only provided a brand name and size. Supposedly they make a "tri-ply" aluminum sandwich version, that might give you a hope if it's what you have.

Other than using a properly seasoned cast iron pan or a coated non-stick pan, if I were trapped on an island with only a stainless steel skillet I'd probably try treating it like a cast iron pan and seasoning it.

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Stainless steel cookware is NOT meant as cookware with nonstick properties, nor is it meant to be a replacement for such - before the invention of nonstick pans, people used cast iron/wrought iron pans - not stainless steel, big difference! - for anything that had a habit to burn/stick.

For some preparations, you let the ingredients intentionally stick a bit until the layer of food directly contacting the pan surface shrinks/dries enough to release the food on its own - that is the reason for doing pan-flipping antics instead of just using a turner (which will force ingredients off the pan that are not yet fried enough) in some classic sauteing techniques. Not for every ingredient :)

The only things that could help with the rest are keeping a lot of motion going in the pan (very frequently stirring) and using liberal amounts of oil to keep ingredients suspended in/swimming on top of the oil.

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Not sure if you're concern is burning or sticking, or both. My thoughts are any combination of:

  • you are not using enough oil or butter
  • you are adding egg to a pan that isn't hot enough yet
  • you may have a low grade of stainless

This video on YouTube shows some good egg cooking on stainless. It's scrambled eggs.

This video was a very interesting approach to a fried egg in a stainless pan. I've never prepared the pan by boiling off water. (if someone has done this, please chime in) I probably missed some info because I don't speak the language in this one. Does she something additional in the water?

If you don't want to use allot of oil, you would have to consider using non-stick pans or well seasoned iron pans.

  • Without looking at the video, getting the griddle/pan hot enough to make a drop of water ball up and skitter around the surface rater than sit there and evaporate is a standard test of "is it hot enough for pancakes" (at least.) – Ecnerwal Aug 19 '16 at 20:43

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