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Wooden cutting boards look good and are pricier whereas Anti Microbial ones are darn cheap and I am not sure what chemicals/materials they use to make the boards anti microbial. Are these boards safe to use and dependable? Can these boards be used for carving meat?

  • I always thought an Anti-Microbial cutting board was just one that had no crevices for nasty bacteria to hide in – Neil Meyer Sep 20 '16 at 11:07
  • If they weren't safe for food, they wouldn't be selling them for food use... Regardless, much like Teflon, I'm sure you can find groups of people who think they are dangerous. – Catija Sep 20 '16 at 11:14
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    The answer to this question, cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/618/… may give you a little more info. – Cindy Sep 20 '16 at 13:00
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    I've gotten away from wooden cutting boards because they are expensive to replace and a bit unwieldy in terms of weight. There are times, however, when wood if preferable. Make sure your cutting board is made of hardwood, is made from a single slab of wood instead of strips or composite, and is finished without any flaws on the cutting side. Maintain it per instructions, and all should go well. – Shalryn Sep 22 '16 at 16:28
  • @Shalryn The question is addressing non-wood cutting boards, not wood ones. – Catija Sep 22 '16 at 23:25
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Lots of hardwoods have antibicrobial properties, so a board that is well-crafted and properly maintained will be safe to use and will last much longer than a synthetic cutting board. Many privately owned butcher shops work over a hardwood table. To clean the surface, you can either scrub with bleach water or you can cover the surface with salt to pull moisture from the board and kill any microorganisms on the surface. Always treat your hardwood cutting surfaces with food safe mineral oil.

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As long as you properly maintain your wooden cutting board, you will be ok. (http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/09/how-to-season-and-maintain-a-wood-cutting-board.html)

If they really use chemicals, they do not say which one it is, but I would assume most of those cutting board just make it "easier" to clean and maintain.

For example Microban: http://www.microban.com/who-we-work-with/industries/ck

"... Microban antimicrobial protection is infused into the board cutting...Microban technology is not designed to replace normal cleaning practices or protect users against foodborne illness. Microban protection works continuously to make C&K cutting boards easier to clean and to keep them cleaner between cleanings...."

Just get a high(er) quality wooden board and maintain it properly and you will be fine.

  • "Microban technology is a built-in antibacterial protection for solid products, coatings and fibres. Microban antibacterial protection gives products an added level of protection against damaging microbes such as, bacteria, mould and mildew that can cause cross-contamination and product deterioration..." Source:microban.colop.com/mb_en/about-microban.html – user50547 Sep 20 '16 at 11:16
  • Which one of them is the best for carving meat? – user50547 Sep 20 '16 at 11:20
  • I use a good wooden board and clean it with water and coarse salt. – Max Sep 20 '16 at 12:50
  • even I use the same but wanna know from someone who has also used an anti microbial one if that is at all useful for carving meat because AM's seemed extremely thin to me and supposedly would make it hard to work with in case of meats. – user50547 Sep 20 '16 at 13:05
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    @SaurabhCooks There are some AM's that are very thin, some even flexible and I wouldn't recommend those for meat. But you can get much thicker AM's that will be substantial for meat (1/2" -3/4" thick). We use both wood and AM. I would just go with your preference. – Cindy Sep 20 '16 at 17:28
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I don't know why you think thin would be harder to cut meat. You can get thicker with a grove for catching liquid.

Yes I have used anti microbial for cutting meat and it worked fine for me.

I like plastic as for me they are quicker to clean than wood. They also store better because they are thinner. Plastic is dishwasher safe. I have worked in profession kitchens where all we had is plastic and I suspect the main reason is dishwasher safe and storage. We did not cut a lot of raw meat but when I did I had no problem.

Kind of related:

The listeria at Blue Bell ice cream was traced to wooden pallets. The same strain was at more than one facility and pallets was on the few items that traveled from facility to facility. They replace them with plastic pallets.

Not complaining about the down votes. But OP specifically asked in a comment had someone used one for cutting meat.

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