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We're having a decent sized party, and hoping to serve rib roasts (we're looking at 3 7-rib roasts). The problem is, we only have access to the ovens on site 2 hours before we want to eat. This doesn't give us enough time to do the full cooking on site. What's the best way to start them at home and finish them off on site? Would it work out to do a couple hours at 250 or so to warm them, transport them foil wrapped in a cooler, and then blast them at 450 on site? Or flip that around and cook at high heat first and try and hold them once we get the kitchen?

  • Tough call. Maybe experiment both ways. Ask the site to have the ovens preheated so you don't lose that time. – paparazzo Oct 3 '16 at 3:55
  • How big are the roasts and what's your target done-ness? – GdD Oct 3 '16 at 9:20
  • Full rib roasts, so around 15-20 lbs. Aiming for rare to medium rare. – Eclipse Oct 3 '16 at 13:57
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This is a perfect application for sous vide cooking. I would pre-sear, bag, sous vide @ 58C (136.5 F) for 5 to 10 hours, then chill. All that can be done ahead of time. Bring to the site, re-therm for a couple of hours, crank the oven, and finish in a hot oven to develop outer crust.

  • pre-sear ? or sear (broil) just before serving ? – Max Oct 3 '16 at 14:29
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    @Max : Sear just before serving, so there's a bit of texture on the exterior. (as that can get lost with a pre-sear); if you don't have a sous-vide rig, you can cook in an oven at low temperature to the desired doneness, then roast 'em at high heat (or broiler if you're not trying for a standing rib roast) before serving. – Joe Oct 3 '16 at 15:26
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    @Max Actually, both pre-sear and finish with either sear or high heat in oven. If you want a more traditional end product, the oven works well. High heat to reform crust – moscafj Oct 3 '16 at 17:08

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