6

I usually buy chicken legs in a pack of four from the supermarket and the packet comes at 1000grams.

This would mean that each leg should be 250 grams.

I am trying to calculate how many calories are in each leg after I cook them. (I cook them on the bone without the skin in the oven)

I usually eat my chicken legs on the go so weighing them before and after I eat the meat is not an option.

I am not sure if my chicken legs would be considered small, medium or large and am trying to calculate the amount of calories I eat when I eat each chicken leg.

If anybody has any idea this would be of great help

  • 8
    You could easily take the bones back home to weigh, just put them back in whatever you used to transport the cooked chicken (which you would have weighed first to use a cooked chicken calorie value) . This would be the only way to be sure, and you'd only have to do it once or twice. Or even weigh the bones on the rare occasions you don't eat them on the go. – Chris H Nov 10 '16 at 17:23
  • 3
    Does your calorie count have to be so exact that you can't just use a site that estimates this for you? – Catija Nov 10 '16 at 17:46
  • 1
    @ChrisH They would not have the same weight after cooking. And would dry out more in the bag. – paparazzo Nov 11 '16 at 15:46
  • 5
    @Paparazzi Weigh after cooking and then weigh the bones after eating. Difference is weight of cooked chicken. Look up cooked chicken calories per unit mass (easy in somthing like fitnesspal). In a sealed bag they wouldn't lose enough mass to make any difference when compared to the rounding error. Ignore the weight before they were cooked – Chris H Nov 11 '16 at 15:52
  • @ChrisH Then easy enough – paparazzo Nov 11 '16 at 16:17
3

27% is the percentage of raw bone in a chicken leg.

Source: Bone Percentage in Raw Meaty Bones

1

I'll refer to this article: Cost and Yield Comparison of Ready-To-Cook Chicken Product by J.H. Denton and D.B. Mellor, Extension Poultry Marketing Specializtis, The Texas A&M University System, Texas Agricultural Extension Service L-2290

This is Table 1 of the article:

enter image description here

The table assumes you start with 1 pound of the chicken product, and the quantities in the raw column are the weight of the meat&skin (or meat) that's edible. The cooked columns are the amount of edible stuff after cooking in those methods (so a fried chicken has the coating, meat and skin, for example).

  • The OP states they cook the meat in the oven (roasted) without the skin... Is there any indication that the "roasted" column is with or without skin? – Catija Jul 14 '17 at 0:45
  • @Catija - you'd want to compute calories by taking the meat column raw, and then figuring out how many calories are for that. But the roasted column is with the skin. – Batman Jul 14 '17 at 1:02
1

1/4th to 1/3 rd is normal for bone in fowl. Larger legs are on the low side for bone. Small legs on the high side for bone. When buying fowl. The bigger the fowl the less bone to meat ratio. This is for rough figuring. On chicken & turkey at the store. Legs would be 50 t0 60% bone. Breast far less. bone. Per. meat. This is raw fowl. This is why when you buy a turkey at thanksgiving you always buy one over 18lb. For max. meat to bone ratio. Same with chicken. Ducks are different build.

-1

I did a little research for you and found that 250gr of chicken equals 8.8oz. From there, I looked into cooked chicken legs on the bone with no skin and I found that 8.8 oz. of that specific kind of chicken nets you 316.7 calories. I hope this helps.

  • 1
    Hello, and welcome to Stack Exchange. It isn't clear what you mean; perhaps "316.7 ounces" should be "316.7 grams"? (Even assuming that change, it's a bit confusing.) – Daniel Griscom Nov 15 '16 at 12:15
  • 1
    Do you have a source for the calories per weight you used to go from 8.8 ounces to 316.7 calories? – Cascabel Nov 16 '16 at 1:55
-2

Nutrition Facts

Calories in Church's Chicken: Original Chicken Leg (with Skin)

Serving Size: 1 serving

Amount Per Serving Calories 140.0

  • Please back this up with a link. You got it from somewhere... – user34961 Aug 28 '17 at 17:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.