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When I want to get fancy and add fruit juice to a saute pan to braise my meat, the juices from the fruit often caramelize too fast and burn before my meat is ready. What do you in that case? I have thought about half plate sauce and half plate meat, but then I will deglaze charred juices from the meat half will ruin the finished sauce.

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  • I've answered based on a bit of an assumption about what you're doing. If you're following a recipe (or inspired by one) it might be a good idea to post it.
    – Chris H
    Nov 21, 2016 at 13:03

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You could try adding a little water before the juice, to start the process of braising and loosening any meat juices from the pan. This would be much less than the volume of juice, but would still lower the surface temperature of the pan in case instant scorching of the juice is your issue. Then when the water has almost gone you can add the juice.

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  • I have thought about it as well. But then comes the issue of lowering the temperature of the oil to boiling temperature, which prevents the maillard effect. Then, it's either I boil my meat, or I burn the sauce.
    – Bar Akiva
    Nov 21, 2016 at 15:32
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    Juice is essentially sugary water, with a little acid. So the oil temperature drops when you add the juice anyway.
    – Chris H
    Nov 21, 2016 at 15:35
  • So would you suggest to add the juice when the meat is nearly done? I could technically cook it after the meat is done but then I don't get the chance to braise the meat.
    – Bar Akiva
    Nov 21, 2016 at 15:57
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    Not really. You want it to reduce which takes time. I just suggest adding it a little later, having added some water when you currently add the juice, which will have nearly all evaporated when the juice does hit the pan. So the pan surface temperature does almost exactly what it does now, but the juice doesn't hit such a hot pan, or stay in contact with it for so long.
    – Chris H
    Nov 21, 2016 at 16:01
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    I assume this process is best made after you gave your meat a good sear. That way I don't have to worry about boiling my meat - right?
    – Bar Akiva
    Nov 21, 2016 at 16:17

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